PDA

View Full Version : Drivers License - For 5th Wheel and Truck..



ve1drg
07-19-2009, 05:25 PM
Just wondering if all states and provinces have the same regulation when it comes to licensing drivers that pull trailers over 10,000lbs.

In Ontario a driver that pulled a trailer over 10,000lbs needs an A license or in other words a Tractor Trailer license.

Is this the case in all provinces and States?? If so I bet there are a lot of people out there that will need to upgrade their licenses. Or am I mistaken..??

timdebs
07-19-2009, 05:40 PM
i believe recreational vehicles are exempt in the US. If you are driving a commercial vehicle and the weight is over 26,000 lbs then a class b or class a is required. Too many congressman have recreational vehicles so they did not want to have to get a special license.

Bob&Patty
07-19-2009, 06:02 PM
Ted, this has be discussed a lot here on the forum. You might type in "license" in the search page. In california, under 10K your class "C" is good, 10K -15K you need an indorsement for your class"C". 15001 and above you need a class "A" non- commercial license. Bob:D

branson4020
07-19-2009, 06:06 PM
Every state has its own laws regarding licensing requirements, trailer lengths & weights, equipment required and much more. Here is a link that has a table of requirements: http://www.towingworld.com/articles/TowingLaws.htm

2010augusta
07-19-2009, 06:49 PM
My Tennessee license is good for up to 26,000 lbs and the GCWR of the F-450 is 26,000. I bet there is a reason for this.

Bob&Patty
07-19-2009, 07:11 PM
Allen, ya think that law might be for the stupid kids in Calif. Lets see.....1/2 PU + 4012 Cyclone + 80MPH = gonna be ugly. Had one pass me today at 85 in the fast lane on a 4 lane interstate and I was going 60 with the Horn. "Stupid is as stupid does", but it's my life out there too. BTW, in Calif. the speed limit is 55 for trucks and trailers. Bob:D:D

Delaine and Lindy
07-19-2009, 07:48 PM
Does anyone know of any RVer who has gotten a ticket for being over weight in a RV, you know first hand knowledge not hearsay. I think most of the Heavy 5th wheels and the 1 ton Truck Trucks are close or over 26,000 Gross weight (Truck/5th wheel). When we had the Chevy Kodiak 4500 the Truck and 5th wheel had a Gross weight of 27,900 lbs. The 2008 1 ton and the Mobile Suites total weight was 24,400. I haven't weight the Freightliner yet but will when when get hooked up to the 2010 Mobile Suites. I know it will be heavy. I do carry a Class A (CDL) with indorsements. I do know some States are begining to push a different lic requirement, and I expect there will be more States to follow. Just think of the money they can take from us, and waste more money and they get their hands in our pocket. GBY.......

DntDctr
07-19-2009, 08:12 PM
Does anyone out here really believe that we should be able to jump into 18-25k pound monsters without any training? I do it and don't have a problem with it but I always thought it was a little silly for the states to give us the ok to do so without some sort of requirements. We're not all sensible out here.

trvlrerik
07-19-2009, 09:25 PM
I just went to a DOT compliance school for work, this issue came up. I was advised if you are driving any vehicle, or combination of truck/trailer that has a gross vehicle rating over 10,000 lbs. you must have a class A license, UNLESS you are pulling a recreational vehicle or farm implement. The DOT teacher said that the r/v dealers and the farmers have very powerful lobbies so heavy weights do not apply. The only states that make r/vs weigh are Nebraska and Kentucky, they are only concerned about overweight vehicles / axel weights, not licences.

truknutt
07-19-2009, 09:51 PM
My Tennessee license is good for up to 26,000 lbs and the GVWR of the F-450 is 26,000. I bet there is a reason for this.

Alan,

Please tell us your GCWR is 26,000; my F-450 has a GVWR of only 14,500 but a GCWR of 33,000. Don't intend to sharpshoot ya it's just that I notice that some on here are trying to learn this weight stuff and any misspeak really confuses them.

I just had to increase the GVWR on my registration after someone, whom shall remain nameless (dieselengineer) was kind enough to point out the error in my regisitration sticker! :cool: With the Cyclone sparingly loaded the truck's front and rear axle weights totaled 11540 and of course the dealership and I registered it at 11000! So I bumped it up to 14000 and now the Commonwealth will get more of my cash each year..maybe it will help them pass a State budget!! HA!

bigredtruck
07-19-2009, 11:27 PM
In British Columbia, you have to get an endoresement on your license to haul over 10000 lbs. There is a test.
We also just found out that to insure the truck and trailer properly, we have to have the truck inspected at the weigh scales.
We have been looking at semis for the last couple of weeks and were wondering how these 3/4 tons were towing such heavy fifth wheels. Then cam upon an articles that explains (a little bit) about the difference in GVWR and GCWR and pulling a firth wheel vs a travel trailer. So we have put off searching ebay for a freightlinerand will check with whoever we can find so make sure we are safe with the 1 ton. Not an easy task as you can't get a straight answer, but probably cheaper in the long run.

62cwil
07-20-2009, 01:14 AM
I know for a fact in CA you need an endorsement on a regular drivers license if you tow a rig weighing more than 10K. I read about it on a forum a few years ago and checked the CA web site and sure enough if says you do. Several weeks later I took my grandson to the DMV and while there I decided to apply. They had me fill out a form and then take a test only. I passed and now have a Drivers License that has a 10K endorsement for 5th wheel over 10k.

2010augusta
07-20-2009, 02:55 AM
Alan,

Please tell us your GCWR is 26,000; my F-450 has a GVWR of only 14,500 but a GCWR of 33,000. Don't intend to sharpshoot ya it's just that I notice that some on here are trying to learn this weight stuff and any misspeak really confuses them.

I just had to increase the GVWR on my registration after someone, whom shall remain nameless (dieselengineer) was kind enough to point out the error in my regisitration sticker! :cool: With the Cyclone sparingly loaded the truck's front and rear axle weights totaled 11540 and of course the dealership and I registered it at 11000! So I bumped it up to 14000 and now the Commonwealth will get more of my cash each year..maybe it will help them pass a State budget!! HA!

Thanks for the correction. Mine could have a GCWR of 30,000, but I don't know if it has the high capicity tow package or not.

jnbhobe
07-20-2009, 06:04 AM
Hey Truknutt; Did you know that in PA you can get a permenent plate for any trailer over 10,000 lbs GVW. I think its $125 one time fee. Just a thought Thats what I did. JON :D :D :D

htneighbors
07-20-2009, 07:21 AM
The only states that make r/vs weigh are Nebraska and Kentucky, they are only concerned about overweight vehicles / axel weights, not licences.

I'm currently in Nebraska and have traveled through several times over the past year & a half. Every weigh station I have passed, has a sign saying "Recreational Vehicles Exempt". I've never stopped and - so far - haven't had a problem.

geeksrus
07-20-2009, 07:30 AM
Nothing like that here in Alberta, as far as I know.

Eh!

Delaine and Lindy
07-20-2009, 07:34 AM
I will have permanent plates put on our 5th wheel the next time we have to renew. I didn't know that was possible. I do have permanent plates on my Car and Gooseneck trailer. However if I don't it only cost $14.00 per year. Just transfered my plates from the 2008 Chevy to the Freightliner and it cost $54.00 per year.


I agree there should be training for people to operate any vehicle that tows any RV's and for sure the Motor Homes. Being a one time Truck driver and having Commerical Lic since I was 21 years old there should be on hands training and some Class room training. Smart new RVer's will seek out some form of training. I'm really surprised that State and Local governments have came of with that to get more of your hard owned money.

As for the Gross tow rating on the F450 it was 33,000 lb with the 4.88 rear gear and when Ford stopped putting the 4.88 rear gear in I think Job 1 Trucks they then went and put 4.30 rears gears in to try and raise the fuel mileage. I still couldn't understand how a F-450 had higher ratings than a F-550?? As we all know number are made to be changed. Be Safe. GBY....

htneighbors
07-20-2009, 07:35 AM
Ted, this has be discussed a lot here on the forum. You might type in "license" in the search page. In california, under 10K your class "C" is good, 10K -15K you need an indorsement for your class"C". 15001 and above you need a class "A" non- commercial license. Bob:D

Hey Bob, (or someone) -

Does CA, or all states for that matter, reciprocate on with each other's licensing laws? Or is CHP sitting in wait at the state line, looking for out-of-staters to cross over so they can check their licenses? After reading posts on here, I've been hesitant to get the urge to drive in Cali! :confused:

wdk450
07-20-2009, 10:08 AM
Hey Bob, (or someone) -

Does CA, or all states for that matter, reciprocate on with each other's licensing laws? Or is CHP sitting in wait at the state line, looking for out-of-staters to cross over so they can check their licenses? After reading posts on here, I've been hesitant to get the urge to drive in Cali! :confused:

What I have heard a number of times on these forums is that the local state can enforce its own rules as to vehicle length, weight,etc., but must observe the originating state's requirements on driver's licensing. I have read postings of overlength vehicles being stopped and impounded upon entering California.

wdk450
07-20-2009, 10:12 AM
Every state has its own laws regarding licensing requirements, trailer lengths & weights, equipment required and much more. Here is a link that has a table of requirements: http://www.towingworld.com/articles/TowingLaws.htm

Sir:
This chart is a great reference, but when checking the driver license requirements under California, I did not see the note that a non-commercial Class A is required if your towed rig is over 16000 lbs. i have rfead this in the vehicle code.

jayc
07-20-2009, 10:15 AM
I believe that there is reciprocity between the states on licensing requirements but not on things like triple towing that are safety issues and are on a state-by-state basis. I believe that there is a disclaimer in all states that exempt RV's being driven/pulled for personal use from weight limits and know that RV's are not required to stop in weigh stations as long as they are not being driven/towed as a commercial unit, ie: new Rv being delivered.

wdk450
07-20-2009, 10:16 AM
I know for a fact in CA you need an endorsement on a regular drivers license if you tow a rig weighing more than 10K. I read about it on a forum a few years ago and checked the CA web site and sure enough if says you do. Several weeks later I took my grandson to the DMV and while there I decided to apply. They had me fill out a form and then take a test only. I passed and now have a Drivers License that has a 10K endorsement for 5th wheel over 10k.

As i understand you did not have to take a driving test and have your rig there.
For the noncommercial Class A you have to have your rig, drive and back it up. My problem is for that license is the catch 22 that you have to arrive at the DMV LEAGALLY with a correctly licensed driver driving the rig, or risk a citation and possible impoundment.

jmgratz
07-20-2009, 10:48 AM
I have driven my RV in all states except Alaska, Hawaii, and Washington state and have never stopped at a weigh station nor have I had a problem. Even passed State Troopers running radar and commercial enforcement without issue. I you are towing legally you won't have a problem.

Bob&Patty
07-20-2009, 05:35 PM
Bill, yes you are correct. If your trailer is 15001 #, you have to have someone with the proper endorsment drive the vehicle to DMV. The only time you have to take the drive test is for "class A" non-commercial. BTW, most DMV's have no idea of what you are talking about when you ask for either test. Amazing.

HT, come on down, you would probably never be stopped for anything. You forget my truck and the Horn are registered in Montana. I never get stopped. You might if you do something stupid though.:eek:

Montana has a 1 time pay permanent plate also and no smog laws.:cool: One heck of a lot cheaper than Calif. Pays to own property there. Bob

truknutt
07-20-2009, 06:36 PM
Hey Truknutt; Did you know that in PA you can get a permenent plate for any trailer over 10,000 lbs GVW. I think its $125 one time fee. Just a thought Thats what I did. JON :D :D :D


No kiddin' ? She's registered until 2012 so I'll have to do the math on that since I will be hanging onto this Cyclone for quite a few years, or so sayeth the "Keeper of the Wallet"!! Hmm, but if I do the permanent plate thing "SWMBO" will lock me into keeping this one forever....:rolleyes:

I was able to con her into the new truck by "strategically" buying the Cyclone that was out of my 2003's towing weight range!! :D She's pretty smart so she's probably on to me now especially 'cause like all he-men I beat my chest a little to much when I pulled off that little coup!!

Thanks for that little unspoken PennDot tid-bit, Jon.

azbound
07-20-2009, 10:30 PM
One issue to consider is if you do not have the required license or endorsement and get in an accident, how will the police and your insurance company or the other vehicles insurance company react? Being you are not licensed to operate your vehicle, are you in big trouble? My guess is , yes. The police may cite you and your insurance may balk at your claim and the other guy's insurance may sue you.

Something to think about. Are you willing to take the Chance?

By the way I have the proper endorsement on my license, do you?

Oldlthrneck
07-21-2009, 03:40 PM
I have heard all kinds of horror stories about vehicles and trailers impounded, people stopped by police and made to weigh, just about any scenario you can think of. Vehicle accidents that landed someone in prison for 20 years, because they were overweight. But, I do not know one person that it has happened to. I have only heard stories about a friend of a friend, or they read it on some forum. I have traveled in almost every state west of the Mississippi, and have never had a policeman of any kind ever give me a second glance. When you are traveling just look at all the RVs out there on the roads. If the cops were sitting at the border waiting to jump on Gramps and Grams tooling down the road, I am not sure that would sit too well with the tourist industry. If I knew some state was doing that, I would sure look for another place to spend my time and money, and most of you probably would too.

p.s. Losing elizabeth's vacation spending alone could cripple the economy of most states.:eek::p;)

jmgratz
07-21-2009, 04:32 PM
One issue to consider is if you do not have the required license or endorsement and get in an accident, how will the police and your insurance company or the other vehicles insurance company react? Being you are not licensed to operate your vehicle, are you in big trouble? My guess is , yes. The police may cite you and your insurance may balk at your claim and the other guy's insurance may sue you.

Something to think about. Are you willing to take the Chance?

By the way I have the proper endorsement on my license, do you?

I don't think that is a big worry. Look at it this way, how many accidents are caused by illegal activities such as speeding, illegal lane changes, failure to control speed, running red lights, running stop signs, no tail lights, driving without lights, driving while intoxicated, etc etc etc ... Insurance companies still pay claims on crashes where those are causes. You can what if yourself to death and if you want to worry your way through life go ahead. As for me, I will try to do the right thing and let the 'chips fall where they may". Then maybe I can live longer without the senseless worrying. BTW an insurance company will pay a claim on an unlicensed driver driving your vehicle as long as they had your permission to drive your vehicle. (At least in Texas they will)

HarleyRyder
07-21-2009, 06:12 PM
At the risk of adding more fuel to the fire here is a link to the California RV Handbook. http://www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/dl648/dl648.pdf

Re wdk450's comment on law enforcement waiting at the border to stop over length vehicles. I used to own a 40' diesel pusher with which I towed a 28' foot boat on a triple axle trailer all over the southwest. Never got stopped or even looked at. This combination was 71' long not counting the outdrive on the boat and both were registered in California.
California law is 65' for a combination of vehicles.

Re jmgratz comments on drivers that commit violations of the vehicle code. Based on my experience (30 years with a SoCal police dept) it is those drivers that draw the attention of law enforcement. It is my opinion that it is these same drivers who start the rumors on forums and blogs about how they were stopped for only 5 MPH over the speed limit when in fact they were 20 MPH or better and the officer cut the driver a break and wrote the cite for less.

Oldlthrneck is right. I have heard the same horror stories but I have never talked to anyone who had it happen to them. It is always "I heard...".

Having said that, I have one experience where I was stopped just as I crossed in to Iowa on I80. My wife and I had just picked up our new 3612 Razor in Ohio last August and had just entered Iowa when I saw two state troopers on an enforcement stop. As I approached the stop I moved over one lane for safety and noted that my speed was 5 MPH under the posted limit. One of the officers looked at our rig, sprinted to his car and pulled us over. The reason for stopping us? He thought we were contract hauling the Razor for a dealer; even though we had the appropriate temp tag prominently displayed on the rear of the trailer. He became even more apologetic about the stop when he found that I had a Class A commercial license. The trooper was at all times courteous and professional. He said he followed a hunch and was wrong.

I know my experience in Iowa is not the same as being dragged to a weigh station etc., but on occasion "stuff" happens. Kind of a long way around to saying that if you "do what is right" you should have no problems in any state.

Larryheadhunter
07-22-2009, 05:38 AM
Harley Rider has it right on. I got stopped for speeding in Tulare, CA and the Chp gave me a fix it ticket instead. The CA vehicle code states and my drivers licence now reflects that number 41. Can drive recreational vehicle over 10,001 up to 15,000 Lbs. This is a 20 question, read the book for 20 minutes test. Its in the CA DMV. If you get stopped in another state that doesn't have that on their books, it will do u no good as u were stopped for a different reason, so it won't help if there is a reciprocal agreement. I was warned that if I was in an accident in Ca without this endoresement that it put me in jeopardy. Whatever that means.

Triber
08-11-2009, 09:26 AM
In BC, if you tow a rig of more thn 10,000# GVW, you must have a Class 1 (commercial Truck license), a class three (Bus or transportation) or a "51" endorsement (Heavy house trailer). The 51 endorsement requires you to pass a written test and a road test with an examiner. If you don't have this endorsement and you are involved in an accident, your insurance can refuse to cover you. It is a good idea. Judging by the number of big rigs I have seen barreling down the highway behind 1/2 ton pickups, there needs to be some enforcement. People think that just because the 1/2 ton pulls it, they are OK. They don't know or don't care that the truck brakes are too small, the gear ratios are wrong and their frame and suspension is under huge stress.

porthole
08-11-2009, 02:57 PM
I guess you're all concerned about whether the driver of that 40' 5th wheel and 1/2 ton truck is capable of operating that 20-25K pound rig.

How about this - at least in New Jersey, a CDL is not required for ANY fire fighter to operate a fire vehicle. Doesn't matter if it is the department's mini cooper, 5-8,000 gallon water tanker with it's own dynamics or the 79,000 pound ladder truck with air brakes.

Think about it the next time you are a little slow to move over for a fire vehicle "legally" traveling 10 mph over the speed limit, with a bit of adrenaline flowing, in a vehicle he/she may or may not have any knowledge of it's mechanics.

JohnDar
08-11-2009, 05:50 PM
I guess you're all concerned about whether the driver of that 40' 5th wheel and 1/2 ton truck is capable of operating that 20-25K pound rig.

How about this - at least in New Jersey, a CDL is not required for ANY fire fighter to operate a fire vehicle. Doesn't matter if it is the department's mini cooper, 5-8,000 gallon water tanker with it's own dynamics or the 79,000 pound ladder truck with air brakes.

Think about it the next time you are a little slow to move over for a fire vehicle "legally" traveling 10 mph over the speed limit, with a bit of adrenaline flowing, in a vehicle he/she may or may not have any knowledge of it's mechanics.

We don't require a CDL in Michigan to drive fire trucks (or RV's), either. But we require training and state certification that you have been trained and authorized to drive. WE train and mandate that our drivers do not exceed safe conditions, wet or dry, and that they stop at ALL intersections, regardless of the right of way and secure the right of passage for each individual lane. The officer or senior FF next to the driver is also held accountable. Our insurance carrier requires our drivers be at least 23 years old. We use their training program (VFIS-Emergency Vehicle Operator Course), which has been adopted by the state. I'm an instructor for this course. The vast majority of emergency vehicle operators do not jump in, flip on the lights/sirens, and go pedal to metal. Simply having a piece of paper in your pocket does not make you a safe driver, regardless of the vehicle.

DW_Gray
08-11-2009, 11:09 PM
Well I'm in the process of getting my Non-Commercial Class A here in CA for my big rig. I passed the written test today and turned in my health questionnaire. Now there is another delay. The health questionnaire has to be reviewed by someone in Sacramento before I can take the driving test. I guess they're concerned I might keel over at the wheel because of my heart. Well duh, they've been letting me drive for the last 12 years no questions asked. That's California for you. If they come back and deny my license, somebody better come and tie me down.

Forrest Fetherolf
08-11-2009, 11:37 PM
Those fine folks residing in Nevada pulling trailers in excess of 10,000 lbs must have a "J" endorsement added to their class "C" license. As of July 1, 2009 both a 20 question written test and a drive skill test are required.

No big deal only 6 1/2 hours over two days so far to register TV and apply for Nevada DL only to find out a drive skill test is now required for "J" endorsement. Skill test is not allowed at Henderson, NV DMV 5 miles away because parking access is a problem, so will have to tow 5er about 30 miles to DMV in Las Vegas to prove I can drive around the block and back into a simulated campsite and verify 5er VIN for NV registration.

Gosh, I have only been driving for over 51 years (since 16 plus a military license and owned RVs over 45 years)..........I'm a little nervous......... don't know if I have enough driving experience to show my skills.

What do you think "larryheadhunter".......could you give me a reference letter to prove that I have some experience backing up the Bighorns???????

:) :):):) Forrest

cdnrver
09-14-2009, 12:07 PM
Towing an RV in BC of more than 4600 kg (10,141.26 lbs)

If you want to tow an RV that weighs more than 4600 kg (total loaded weight - not dry weight) and neither the recreational trailer nor your truck has air brakes, you need:

a class 1, 2 or 3 driver's license, or
a class 4 or 5 driver's license with a heavy trailer endorsement (code 20), or
a class 4 or 5 driver's license with a house trailer endorsement (code 51).

note:
a code 20 endorsement needs to pass a class 3 written and road test and meet commercial driver vision and medical standards.
a code 51 endorsement needs to pass a recreational trailer knowledge test and road test and meet commercial driver vision and medical standards.

Jaysmith
09-16-2009, 05:29 PM
Does anyone know if in BC, the pin weight is concidered part of the tow vehicle? Meaning that a fifth wheel loaded up that weighs 10500 Lbs but has a hitch weight of 1300 Lbs, the weight of the trailer that would be used to determine if you need the endorsement (code 20) or not is only 9200 Lbs, therefore making it ok to tow with a standard class 5 licence?

Larryheadhunter
09-17-2009, 02:28 AM
Those fine folks residing in Nevada pulling trailers in excess of 10,000 lbs must have a "J" endorsement added to their class "C" license. As of July 1, 2009 both a 20 question written test and a drive skill test are required.

No big deal only 6 1/2 hours over two days so far to register TV and apply for Nevada DL only to find out a drive skill test is now required for "J" endorsement. Skill test is not allowed at Henderson, NV DMV 5 miles away because parking access is a problem, so will have to tow 5er about 30 miles to DMV in Las Vegas to prove I can drive around the block and back into a simulated campsite and verify 5er VIN for NV registration.

Gosh, I have only been driving for over 51 years (since 16 plus a military license and owned RVs over 45 years)..........I'm a little nervous......... don't know if I have enough driving experience to show my skills.

What do you think "larryheadhunter".......could you give me a reference letter to prove that I have some experience backing up the Bighorns???????

:) :):):) Forrest

Forrest, you could backin your rig in the dark, with blindfolds on, and land right on a dime. Free lessons by Forrest, if you can catch him.
I got a fixit "endorsement" ticket in 2008 while driving in Tulare county, CA, which is required of all 5th wheelers with rigs between 10,001 and 15,000 lbs GVWR. It's a 20 question test, that I passed with flying colors. Any CA let me know if you need a copy of the test, as I saved mine. Cheap for a beer.:D

cdnrver
09-17-2009, 08:31 PM
Does anyone know if in BC, the pin weight is concidered part of the tow vehicle? Meaning that a fifth wheel loaded up that weighs 10500 Lbs but has a hitch weight of 1300 Lbs, the weight of the trailer that would be used to determine if you need the endorsement (code 20) or not is only 9200 Lbs, therefore making it ok to tow with a standard class 5 licence?

Your weight for license classification would be your trailer's total weight of 10,500 lbs - pin weight is still part of your trailer weight - and your truck is still towing the entire 10,500 lbs.

Larryheadhunter
09-17-2009, 11:56 PM
Hi Jaysmith,
The easiest method of determining the total trailer weight considered by the law is on the little plaque on the side of your rig that gives the date of Mfg., and for sure the GVWR. When the cop gave me the fixit license endorsement ticket, the first thing he did was go look at that label on the RV to determine my max weight was 14,800 lbs. I hope that answers your question.

buckeyebob
09-18-2009, 06:25 AM
ok,so if i am on a trip from ohio and travel through california on to wash. oregon.and into british col.i will need a special license to pull 2900 mk sundance?even if i am an ohio resident? buckeyebob

Larryheadhunter
09-18-2009, 06:07 PM
bob,
It only stands to reason that you would not be held accountable for CA RV license laws if you are a resident of a different state. It does make me wonder though because of the different gun laws per state. My advice is to call the DMV in Ohio and CA ask that very question.

jmgratz
09-18-2009, 06:12 PM
To my knowledge, all states honor the driver's licenses of each of the other states.

lvfun
10-12-2009, 09:27 PM
Generally speaking, if you tow a weight over 10,000lbs you will need a towing endorsement to your license. This is pretty much uniform across the country. If your gross combined vehicle weight (towing vehicle plus the GVW of the 5'er, not the actual weight in many states, but the capacity of the trailer)exceeds 26,000lbs (some states vary weight) you will most likely need a class A license. I was pulled over in Pomona, CA on the way to Disneyland and the first thing the CHP officer checked was my GCVWR and asked for my class A, indicating if I didn't have it I would be issued a citation. When I bought my Cyclone, I also went the next day and obtained a Class A learners permit and shortly thereafter took the driving test for the Non-Commercial class A.

2010augusta
10-12-2009, 09:44 PM
Here is a Link to another website (http://changingears.com/rv-sec-state-rv-license.shtml) with a very clear state by state descriptions of what DL is required to tow/drive RV's.

2010augusta
10-12-2009, 09:51 PM
I was pulled over in Pomona, CA on the way to Disneyland and the first thing the CHP officer checked was my GCVWR and asked for my class A, indicating if I didn't have it I would be issued a citation.

I see you are located in NV, so perhaps your CHP officer knows that NV requires an Class A/B, but I didn't think that a California could give you a ticket even if you had the wrong Nevada license.

wyleyrabbit
10-13-2009, 07:56 AM
We live in BC and I got my code 51 endorsement this past spring. It was a written test, eye exam, 55-point commercial pre-trip inspection (by me, by memory), and a 1 hour road test towing the bighorn. There was no backing up on the test; in the examiner's words, "my job is to ensure that you are safe on the road, and it really doesn't matter to me how long you take to back into your campsite." If anyone has any questions on this, let me know.

Cheers,
Chris

PS - I believe that there is an agreement that if you meet your home licence requirements, then you're good everywhere. Check it out first before you go anywhere.

TrickyD
10-14-2009, 12:46 AM
After browsing the 2 posted links I think that a lot of info is outdated. Manitoba laws now mimmick those of B.C. Also, according the the driver's handbook RV's must stop at weigh stations. Just returned from a trip to Alberta and noticed signs at the weigh scales in Alberta and Saskatchewan that stated RV's exempt, but not in Manitoba!
I believe the rules changed here in June 2008!

TrickyD

wdk450
02-27-2010, 11:34 AM
The thought crossed my mind today for the many new owners I see posting. You need to check that your driver's license is sufficient for your new rig in your home state. I hear that the rules are starting to be more enforced on this.


Ted, this has be discussed a lot here on the forum. You might type in "license" in the search page. In california, under 10K your class "C" is good, 10K -15K you need an indorsement for your class"C". 15001 and above you need a class "A" non- commercial license. Bob:D

robnmo
02-27-2010, 11:35 PM
In Indiana if you read the legal definitions, then exemptions for CDL's, it puts a "commercial vehicle" over 26K lbs but then in another chapter exempts vehicles registered as RV's, and even vehicles used primarily for purposes of transporting an individuals personal property (paraphrasing here) but every state is going to be different. Can you imagine the ramifications of requiring a CDL for RV's? Physicals, blood pressure testing, medical issues, etc associated with CDL requirements and owning/operating an RV? Bet AARP and the RV industry would get their undies in a wad real quick. (but I've also learned to never say never) ;-)

As for the State compacts, any state in the drivers license compact honors the issuing state's requirements for operator's licensing AND registrations. Something also to think about is in some states it's my understanding if you purchase a "permanent plate" you might be pushing the envelope of a "commercial vehicle" classification thus subject to those regulations.

Someone also mentioned about licensing laws being honored from State to State and compared the different enforcement of Firearms laws from State to State............those are 2 completely different animals, licensing/registration of motor vehicles is dependant upon State Government, but Firearm Laws can be administered and varied by the States but are in themselves regulated Federally.

rvn4fun
02-28-2010, 01:57 PM
We have traveled through many states and have never been asked about drivers licence, in California we have been asked at checkpoints if we had fruit in the rv, pets, and once illegal aliens. We travel very often in Nebraska and have never pulled into a weigh station there. Maybe we have been lucky but we never speed, and always use turn signals. In fact we have been asked for more credentials trying to get campground reservations here in Texas then we have ever had to give a policeman. But this thread is interesting as to what some states require.

DW_Gray
02-28-2010, 02:55 PM
Well I'm in the process of getting my Non-Commercial Class A here in CA for my big rig. I passed the written test today and turned in my health questionnaire. Now there is another delay. The health questionnaire has to be reviewed by someone in Sacramento before I can take the driving test. I guess they're concerned I might keel over at the wheel because of my heart. Well duh, they've been letting me drive for the last 12 years no questions asked. That's California for you. If they come back and deny my license, somebody better come and tie me down.

Update: I never did get my CA license nor have I ever heard from them. As soon as I arrived in Florida I got driver's license here and registered my TV and RV here. California wanted over $1,400 to renew and I have few choice words about that. My initial registration cost here in FL for both was only $289. Next year will be about half that. My driver's license was free and it's good up to 26,000 GVWR.

DXprowler
02-28-2010, 05:56 PM
Information on RV's for Ontario drivers can be found here: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/pubs/recreational-vehicles/part2a.shtml

To summarize: Ontario is reciprocal to out of prov/state drivers if they're legal in their own jurisdiction and have a valid drivers licence.
A Class A Restricted (less air brake endorsement) is required for a combination over 24,250 lbs
What's interesting is that the combination weight is determined by registered weight and not by the total of truck and trailer manufactures GVWR ratings.