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WVUFan
01-06-2010, 09:51 PM
Hi all,
I have a 2010 3670RL. I purchased a new short bed, extended cab truck. I contacted the dealer regarding the installation of a new hitch. The gentlemen stated that a sliding hitch would not be necessary due to the radius (88 deg. according to the literature) allowed by the front cap design.

I was wondering if anyone had any opinions/experience on whether a sliding hitch would still be a good idea.

Any feedback would be appreciated as I'm new to the "5th wheel-hauling scene"! :confused:

caissiel
01-06-2010, 10:32 PM
I pulled 5th wheels with a standard box GM for over 12 years. The units had square front and regular extended pin and never had any problem with turns. I have a F250 with long box because the Ford has much less distance from the cab to the axle center then GM. But I am sure the standard box Ford would be ok with the Heartland Model. Now I regreat not having a Short bed F250 because the short box truck is much more practicle in manuvering this trailer. With the long wheel base the front of the truck has to swing much further and I find the I have to cut much sharper in order to park the unit. The short WB Chev never had any problem with parking the RV. I always had the hitch on the Axle Center line and never behind like some installers do on Dodges.

Two Hands
01-06-2010, 10:43 PM
I have pulled my 2007 Big Horn 3055RL with my 2007 Chevy Silverado crew cab 2500HD diesel with a short bed and no sliding hitch ever since I bought it in November, 2006. With the design of the front cap I have never had any problem. When I have to make a real tight turn getting into a tight camp site the spotter and I keep a close eye out, but we have never had even a close call.

rick_debbie_gallant
01-06-2010, 10:44 PM
Hi all,
I have a 2010 3670RL. I purchased a new short bed, extended cab truck. I contacted the dealer regarding the installation of a new hitch. The gentlemen stated that a sliding hitch would not be necessary due to the radius (88 deg. according to the literature) allowed by the front cap design.

I was wondering if anyone had any opinions/experience on whether a sliding hitch would still be a good idea.

Any feedback would be appreciated as I'm new to the "5th wheel-hauling scene"! :confused:



I sometimes wish that I had a "fixed hitch" rather than the "auto slide" that I have now. You have to be within so many degrees to both hitch and unhitch that some times it becomes a pain. There is no way to hook up or unhook at anymore than 16 degrees to the hitch. confused? i am...

Jellystone
01-06-2010, 10:47 PM
WVUFan, there is a recent post w/a lot of discussion on this topic. Most short bed owners stated that they have not had any issues w/the Heartland's & no slider hitch installed in the TV. I've got a long bed so I can't tell you one way or the other for sure.

Larryheadhunter
01-07-2010, 03:22 AM
I have a short bed Ford F 250 with an auto slider Pullrite that sounds alot like Rick and Debbie's. They are right about the 16 degree hitching and unhitching, but I love the auto slide, because it works while driving both forward and in reverse. In a tight squeeze, I wouldn't be without one. That extra 14 inches has saved me already on a few tight turns and also a few almost mistakes. Better to be safe than sorry.

DntDctr
01-07-2010, 08:21 AM
I had a f250 CC Short box. I also used a fixed 16k reese hitch. I never had any problems pulling my 5er.....except once. We ran into a situation where the back of the trailer was higher than the front, backing in at a hard turn. The trailer doesn't hit the cab usually but with the front of the truck higher and the rear of the trailer higher, uneven surface, it brought them close enough to put a 12" deep crease into the passenger rear corner of the cab. I now have a slider.
Paul

caissiel
01-07-2010, 02:07 PM
On the GM I had 2 CB arials installed in line with the front of the box and when I was hitting the arials it was time to watchout, I still had 4 inches. One time I was backing up in a site and got close enough that I broke the arial on one side. I got the springs installed on the arials and voila I could again cut closer. I have the same setup on the F250 but don't need it with the long box setup. I had the hitch ahead of the wheels for the last trailer and it worked fine with the Ford long Box. But with the BC I almost hit the front door of the trailer with the tail gate open so I setup up the hitch again in the center. Again with the long box I cannot hitch with the tail gate open so I had to remove the Plastic Hitch Cover in order be able to hitch on an angle and the V Tailgate closed.

rick_debbie_gallant
01-07-2010, 02:38 PM
I have a short bed Ford F 250 with an auto slider Pullrite that sounds alot like Rick and Debbie's. They are right about the 16 degree hitching and unhitching, but I love the auto slide, because it works while driving both forward and in reverse. In a tight squeeze, I wouldn't be without one. That extra 14 inches has saved me already on a few tight turns and also a few almost mistakes. Better to be safe than sorry.


I must agree with Larry. I would not be without our Pullrite auto slider either. :)

JohnDar
01-07-2010, 06:49 PM
Hi all,
I have a 2010 3670RL. I purchased a new short bed, extended cab truck. I contacted the dealer regarding the installation of a new hitch. The gentlemen stated that a sliding hitch would not be necessary due to the radius (88 deg. according to the literature) allowed by the front cap design.

I was wondering if anyone had any opinions/experience on whether a sliding hitch would still be a good idea.

Any feedback would be appreciated as I'm new to the "5th wheel-hauling scene"! :confused:



What truck do you have?

lwmcguir
01-07-2010, 07:57 PM
We can turn much sharper than the suspension on the Augusta can stand with a standard hitch and a short bed Ford.

PSF513
01-07-2010, 08:12 PM
I have an 08 F-250 short bed with a B&W Companion hitch (does not slide). I pull a 2010 Big Country 3550 with no problem.

WVUFan
01-07-2010, 08:39 PM
Thanks everyone....I appreciate the input!!

WVUFan
01-07-2010, 08:41 PM
John,
I have a 2008 F250 Super Duty, 6.4 diesel

Two Hands
01-08-2010, 12:08 PM
If only I had known! With the money saved by not buying a slider hitch one could buy a hitch and other equipment designed to reduce chucking and bucking. If I could win the lottery the first thing I would do is install stuff to to improve the ride of my rig.

leftyf
01-08-2010, 09:39 PM
I have pulled my 2007 Big Horn 3055RL with my 2007 Chevy Silverado crew cab 2500HD diesel with a short bed and no sliding hitch ever since I bought it in November, 2006. With the design of the front cap I have never had any problem. When I have to make a real tight turn getting into a tight camp site the spotter and I keep a close eye out, but we have never had even a close call.

2009 Silverado Extended Cab Short Bed. Also, no problems noted.

porthole
01-09-2010, 12:55 PM
I researched this quite in depth before we bought our trailer. And my research as well as many other members is documented well on this site.


I was on the fence but logic dictated that I go with the slider.

Some thoughts:
You most likely will never have to make a 90 degree turn.
The trailer is designed to make an 88 degree turn. But I believe that spec is assuming (love that word) that you are on level ground.

If you have to make a sharp "backing" turn into a driveway or uneven campsite you would be well advised to have a spotter watching the cab/trailer interface.

It is impossible to make a 90 degree turn with GM trucks, and most likely not doable with other SOB's. I'm referring to forward motion here.

I did decide to err on the side of caution and glad I did. I got the PullRite 18K slider, expensive and an excellent item.

We have a Cyclone and Cyclones are 5" wider then the rest of the HL family at 101" and that my friends, makes a difference when making tight turns.



I sometimes wish that I had a "fixed hitch" rather than the "auto slide" that I have now. You have to be within so many degrees to both hitch and unhitch that some times it becomes a pain. There is no way to hook up or unhook at anymore than 16 degrees to the hitch. confused? i am...



I have a short bed Ford F 250 with an auto slider PullRite that sounds alot like Rick and Debbie's. They are right about the 16 degree hitching and unhitching, but I love the auto slide, because it works while driving both forward and in reverse. In a tight squeeze, I wouldn't be without one. That extra 14 inches has saved me already on a few tight turns and also a few almost mistakes. Better to be safe than sorry.




Well boys and girls, if you ever have your trailer more then 16 degrees off center and need to unhitch, all is not lost.

Pop the 2 clevis pins on the sides of the saddle and lift the saddle out with the pin box.
You can be at 90 degrees and do this.

Larryheadhunter
01-10-2010, 04:17 AM
We have a pullrite 18K hitch as Duane said, but frankly we are second guessing ourselves because of the rough ride we are experiencing, although the auto slider is awesome.

The Trailer Saver system made by Hensley mfg. http://www.trailersaver.com (http://www.trailersaver.com/) seems like a great alternative as it is an air-ride hitch that cushions the shock from the road using 2 heavy-duty air bags, and gives you tight precise control of the ride. They also have 2 different sliders available. They say that no other hitch in the market eliminates fore and aft pushing and pulling like their TS3 model or their BD3 model that can be removed in 2 pieces.

porthole
01-10-2010, 01:02 PM
The Trailer Saver system made by Hensley mfg.




I don't remember if I saw the the SaverSlide when I was researching or found it just too expensive.

I was aware of the Hensley product, as I had looked at the TT hitch. But since I never had a problem with our previous trailer I saw no reason for a 2-3000 dollar hitch.

I can't find the price for the slider Trailer air ride hitch but I am sure it is near the over the 4K mark since the non sliders range form 2400-3000.

Maybe with the next tow vehicle. But for now the GMC is going to keep the PullRite.

With a Mor/Ryde pin box and air bags with the wireless controller I am happy with the ride.

The Mor/Ryde IS may have something to do with that too.

D and J
01-11-2010, 05:16 PM
We have '08 3055 with '07 GMC Durmax Short/Reg. box. I had the manual slider hitch installed but never have had to use it. We have logged over 15,000 miles without incident.
D & J
2008 Bighorn 3055
2007 GMC Durmax short bed

rick_debbie_gallant
01-11-2010, 06:27 PM
Well boys and girls, if you ever have your trailer more then 16 degrees off center and need to unhitch, all is not lost.

Pop the 2 clevis pins on the sides of the saddle and lift the saddle out with the pin box.
You can be at 90 degrees and do this.

Never thought of that. Sounds like a plan to me.

Thanks

simplelife
01-20-2010, 08:51 PM
We had the same question and here's the answer that made up my mind. THe Bighorn has an88 degree turning radius. Yes the pull rite works going forward but it is vey expensive. Others only slide when backing and that is usually not when you need them. We went with the b&W companion with the turnover ball. We are happy with our choice. Lot of pluses and very few negatives. Check it out for yourself.

Larryheadhunter
01-20-2010, 09:33 PM
Simplelife, I agree with you totally except I bought and had installed my pullrite 18K super glider for about $2500. Rookies like me needed that extra 14" for both the forward and backwards. I am selling mine now if I get a decent offer, check "Items for Sale", because I need to buy an even more expensive hitch that has 2 air bags in the hitch itself, as I have a very bad back and it helps absorb the bumps and holes etc.
For you and others with expertise in driving a big rig I believe your solution is great.