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Sparkie
02-02-2007, 01:13 AM
The sales people and the Heartland literature say I can pull my new Shenandoah with our 2004 Chevy 3/4 ton Crew Cab short bed Duramax 4x4. After reading this forum I`m having some doubts!

I would greatly apppreciate any input or information from anybody who pulls a Shenandoah with a Chevy 3/4 ton Duramax or other 3/4 ton truck. Any info on your weights would help too. I know I`ll be pushing the weight limits. I`m most concerned about the hitch weight and the resulting axle/tire weight. Oh yeah, and that stopping thing too!

Please assume I`ll be driving safely and cautiously. I have read all the threads posted up to 1-31-07.

Also, if you have any solutions or ideas please share them! THANKS!!!

nhunter
02-02-2007, 10:10 AM
Check out this thread.Sounds like you want to know much the same. //heartlandowners.org/showthread.php?t=2070

slaytop
02-20-2007, 11:10 PM
Sparkie
I'm late at posting to this thread but are you still interested in more information about the Shenandoah?

BluegrassMan
02-21-2007, 12:49 AM
Sparkie:

I'm telling you this from experience (I wish I didn't have this kind of experience). You really don't want to tow any Landmark with a 3/4 ton truck. I have a Dodge 2500HD, in Pa it has a #3 sticker on the windshield meaning a "light duty" one ton with a 8800 lb gvw. Regular 1 Tons start at 9001 lbs in our state. So I'm 200lbs lower. Having said that, your trailer isn't that much lighter that other Landmarks. Sure you'll be able to tow it everywhere, you may have problems getting it stopped in a panic situation. :eek: I had the very problem. Some of the big Landmarks are pushing the boundries of their 1ton duallies. I'm still using my Dodge, I'm looking forward to an F450 in the near future.;)

Sparkie
02-21-2007, 03:49 PM
Slaytop,
Yes, as a new owner of a Shenandoah and a concerned Chevy 3/4 ton 6.6L TV owner I would appreciate any information or advice you could pass on to me! Thanks for your time and concern!!!

slaytop
02-22-2007, 12:42 AM
Sparkie,
I will try to keep this short and to the point. I thought that my new truck was adequate to tow the Shenandoah when I purchased one.

I towed my Shenandoah to a truck stop to weight it before adding any personal items (except one 40 lb. item in the storage unit). I discovered that the pin weight was 3,220 lbs. This caused the total rear axle weight to exceed the 6,084 lb. maximimun by 116 lbs. That was a real surprise! The GCVW was 20,400 lbs. and still under the max (22,000 lbs.) by 1,600 lbs.

When I weighed it at the rally last year, loaded for a trip with only a small amount of fresh water, the truck's rear axle was overloaded by 941 lbs. The GCVW was 100 lbs. over the max.

I added AirLift bags to level out the truck and towed the unit approximately 6,000 miles on a trip last summer with the original wheels and tires. We didn't have any trouble with that combination, however, I was uncomfortable with the overstressed rear wheels and tires. I thought that the air bags might shift some weight forward but the company said that is not so.

Since then I ordered a new set of wheels and tires that I expect to get soon. They are 225x70R19.5 G rated tires and wheels that will raise the capacity to 3,970 lbs per tire or 7,940 lbs for the rear axle. These are not cheap but I don't want to change trucks. Since the GCVW is close to the limit, I'm not very concerned about the brakes.

You won't know if your rig is safe until you weigh it. Try to find a scale that is segmented to catch the weight of each axle of your truck and the trailer axles. Weigh it dry first so you know what the least amount of weight is before adding camping supplies, etc.

I would expect your experience to be similar to mine. Please let us know what you discover when you weigh your rig.

If you search for "Shenandoah" you may find some other posts on this subject.

Larry

ct0218
02-22-2007, 08:29 PM
The only problem with the tire/wheel size change is that by doing so you have changed your differential ratio by quite a bit. Is your truck a GM, Ford, or Dodge? If a GM, then you will also be putting more stress on the Allison-which is why GM does not offer larger wheels. It also reduces your MPG, towing and solo, greater rotational mass. The same is probably also true for the other 2 trucks, just no experience with them.

slaytop
02-22-2007, 10:40 PM
Switching from a 245x75R16 to a 225x70R19.5 tire will change my axle ratio from 3.73:1 to 3.54:1 according to one calculation on the web. The truck's actual speed at 60 mph will be 63.1 mph. The tires will be about 1.5" larger in diameter and my wheels will be lightweight forged aluminum. This is as close to the original tire size and weight as one can get to increase the load rating to a G wheel and tire. I can't comment on actual use at this time but I think it's worth a try.

ct0218
02-22-2007, 10:47 PM
I believe that the tires are somewhat heavier, and though you are saving some weight with the wheel you have significantly more weight at the outer edge of the tire. Can't wait for a first-hand report. Rickson wheels?

JJAK17
02-22-2007, 11:09 PM
Switching from a 245x75R16 to a 225x70R19.5 tire will change my axle ratio from 3.73:1 to 3.54:1 according to one calculation on the web. The truck's actual speed at 60 mph will be 63.1 mph. The tires will be about 1.5" larger in diameter and my wheels will be lightweight forged aluminum. This is as close to the original tire size and weight as one can get to increase the load rating to a G wheel and tire. I can't comment on actual use at this time but I think it's worth a try.

Do you happen to know the web site address to fiqure your axel ratios for the size of tire you are using. I am looking at going to bigger tires and want to know how much the ratio will change. Thanks.

Ray LeTourneau
02-23-2007, 09:26 AM
Although the wheels and tires may be capable of the weight, what about the AXLE and Bearings? Braking capacity as well.

slaytop
02-23-2007, 12:43 PM
According to posts that I have seen elsewhere, my rear axle should be able to carry 11,000 lbs. Since the coach is close to the GCVW max weight and factory specs are generally considered conservative, I don't think the Shenandoah will be too much to handle. I welcome anyone who has reliable technical information to counter anything that I have stated.

jimtoo
02-23-2007, 04:02 PM
I think you looked at the wrong number. I have a 04, 1 ton dually. The GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) is 11,500#. The GAWR RR (Gross Axle Weight Rating Rear) is 8550#. Take another look at your GAWR RR and see what it is.

slaytop
02-24-2007, 12:47 AM
Jimtoo,
The GAWR RR (6,084 lb.) is identical to the tire and wheel capacity on my truck. If not limited by tires, wheels and springs, I have read elsewhere that the rear axle can carry 11,000 lb.

jimtoo
02-24-2007, 01:32 AM
OK,, you just posted what your load limit is on the rear axle, 6084#, that is regardless of the tires and wheels. You can put solid steel wheels on it, but the axle capacity does not change. Oh,, it will carry 11,000# for a while. But let me put it this way. You put 11,000# on that rear axle and you will buy new axle shafts, bearings, hubs, and probably axle housing in a very short time. And don't even think of asking for warranty when it happens. I worked for GM dealer and ran service dept for 34 years and I have seen just about everything that can be done to a truck.

That's my 3 cents worth, to long for 2 cents. End of subject as far as I am concerned.

slaytop
02-24-2007, 08:16 AM
cto218 & jjak17

The wheels and tires I ordered are from Rickson Truck. I ordered the wheels last August and I received notice they were shipped by UPS yesterday. I hope they can do better for other customers. There are other companies that sell 19.5" wheels but primarily for dual wheel applications.

I used www.ricksontruck.com for the axle ratio calculation. Another website to try is www.1010tires.com. Their tire analysis is more complete.