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Rockitman
02-25-2011, 05:42 AM
Just ordered a Cyclone 3800 Hd. Now that I have the hauler, I need a truck and hitch.

According to Heartland it weighs #14750 dry and the hitch weight is #3250. We will be hauling four to six dirt bikes 600-800 lbs. I've been looking at trucks and am leaning toward the Ram Mega Cab 2500 or 3500. I don't really like the drw's, because it's going to be my daily driver, but if I have to go that route thats what I'll do.

The reason I'm leaning towards the Ram instead of the Ford or Chevy (http://www.rv.net/forum/index.cfm/fuseaction/thread/tid/24833016/srt/pd/pging/1/page/2.cfm#) is that they cost about 10k less and they don't use urea. I like the duramax and allison combo, but there aren't many available, small backseat and not much discount off the sticker.

What kind of hitch do I need, slider or nonsilder? I have a friend who tows a 3912 Raptor #13600 dry, hitch weight #3150 with a 2500 srw Ram Mega Cab bagged, sidewinder hitch and says it pulls it no problem.

Any suggestions or advice?

Jimmy
02-25-2011, 08:50 AM
On the hitch, it is always better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it. Go with the slide, its peace of mind...

I'm happy with the CURT Q5 20K Slider.

TXBobcat
02-25-2011, 09:04 AM
The Toy Hauler is to heavy for the 250/2500 truck no matter which brand you go with. If you don't want a DRW go with the 1 ton. The newer TV's have been given a bigger towing capacity, but it is still a big load for a 250/2500. I am pushing the limits of my F250, but I bought it when I was pulling a smaller SOB. If I have the money I would trade up to a F450.

FWIW
BC

Gaffer
02-25-2011, 10:07 AM
No question. Go with 3500 or bigger.

westxsrt10
02-25-2011, 10:25 AM
Even a 3500 duelly would be too light in my view. Go bigger 450-550 to have some safety buffer zone.

mickmey
02-25-2011, 12:32 PM
We are faced with this exact same problem. We have a 1999 F350 DRW and have fallen in love with the 3800HD as well. We won't be hauling any toys (except my dad's power chair and maybe a scooter down the road), but the floor plan works for our family (grandparents, parents, kids). Problem is our F350 (even though it is DRW) was only rated at 12,900 from the 5th wheel hitch. Not even close.

We're a Ford family, so we started looking at 450s for the same reason folks mentioned above. Except I saw the specs on the 2011 F350 DRW...even with a 4x4, it can tow 21,300 from the 5th wheel hitch. That fits the bill. Problem is, any older, and we'd have to go with a 450.

Our concern was that if you tow more than the truck is rated for (whether or not it can actually tow it) you could end up in a liability situation in an accident. There's too much money invested in both our truck and RV to risk that IMHO.

I totally know what you mean about the DRW as a daily driver (as it will be for my hubby, as well). But, the good news is the DRW on the 2011 is a 3.73 axle instead of the 4.3 you'll find on the 450 and older 350 DRW. That'll get better mpg when towing and not towing.

I totally get you on the price thing, but we're in the middle of dealing right now, and most can be had for about $9K off sticker. What's your concern with urea? Just curious, as our dealer explained this technology has been standard on freight trucks for the past few years.

Good luck in your search!

branson4020
02-25-2011, 03:20 PM
I love my 3500 MegaCab SRW, but, I'm over the GVWR of the truck by several hundred pounds with my BH 3385 with an actual, loaded pin-weight of about 2650 lbs. MegaCabs are heavy to start with and have less payload capacity than any other 350/3500 series truck.

rvn4fun
02-25-2011, 08:25 PM
We have been wintered here in Yuma since November and I have never saw so many new Ram pickups pulling campers. It is almost like Ford and Chevy don't make a big pickup anymore. I have talked to some new Ram owners and they said Ram has a manual tranny and that is what they want for fuel economy. Since I am not in the market for a pickup, I haven't paid attention to price but Ram must be a lot cheaper. There are thousands of rvs around here from all over the USA and Canada and if it is being pulled by a new pickup most of the time it is Ram. If you plan on buying a big rv, buy at least a ton dually to pull it, and get a good hitch. We had a 15 ton hitch when we went to pick up our Big Country new and right away the service manager was on me about trying to pull that big rv with that little hitch. We only pulled it 22 miles back to the campground, before switching to a 25 ton Airsafe hitch. Just my observations.....

Birchwood
02-25-2011, 09:48 PM
You will have to watch your weight carefully with a 1 ton dually.The GVWR of a 1 ton dually is between 11000
and 12000 lbs.Pin weight of Cyclone plus truck weight will be in the 10500 lb range.
The max GVWR of your trailer is 18000 lb so therefore buy a 20K + hitch.
The GVWR of a 3/4 ton will be exceeded by over 1000 lbs before you even load you trailer
and that is considerable weight when stopping.
A 1 ton SRW may do the job unless you are planning nation wide travel.

6.7powerstroke
02-25-2011, 11:43 PM
You are going to love the 2011, it is a sweet truck. There is not a 5th wheel on the market that the new F350 Dually can't pull legally with plenty of room to spare. The person who posted the 11000-12000 GVWR is wrong, the GVWR on the new F350 is 13,300 pounds, with a payload of over 5000 pounds. That truck is going to barely squat when you hook up even the largest tri axle trailer. You really don't need the 450, your mileage will suffer as it has higher gear rations.

As for your urea, this is a proven technology that has been out there for years. I wouldn't touch the Dodge technology as it has a catalyst that has a finite life span (like a catalytic convertor) that is going to be a heck of a lot more expensive than the $40 a year you spend on urea. It is the same technology that Mercedes uses in its Bluetec diesels and BMW in theirs, along with pretty much every over the road truck built after 2010. Dodge even uses it in their cab and chassis configuration. Bottom line is that it works great, is proven technology and super cheap.

As for the number of trucks on the road, that stat is laughable that Ram has more. The numbers are staggering. Ram is a distant third and losing market share at an alarming rate to Ford and GM. Ford is selling 30K Super Duties per month and the GMs are selling fast too. Ram has sold 250K Rams since 2007, when their 6.7 came out. Ford has sold that many in its first year of production and now accounts for 50% of the HD truck market. Maybe there is a Ram plant in Yuma or something. Enjoy your new truck, it will be a blast!

crazybanshee
02-25-2011, 11:57 PM
If you are concerned about safety for you and the family a 1 ton DRW is the minimum. I have a F350 SRW sitting in the driveway that has been hooked to the Cyclone once. Don't know what I was thinking.
Doug

lwmcguir
02-26-2011, 03:15 PM
We have several F series trucks and have towed various trailers with all of them. We usually tow the heavy trailers with the F550 due to the extra fuel capacity and the 16 ply tires so overloading really isn't an issue. We have towed some of the heavy loads with or 2011 F350 SRW with 20 inch wheel/tires and it is close to being as stable as the F550. Obviously on poor roads the F550 is going to outperform regarding stability but on "normal" roads the new Ford is very impressive. Due to the 35% better fuel mileage the F350 is going to get used much more. If you haven't drove one and are looking to upgrade then give the F350's a look and if you are going to be heavy then get the 20 inch tires/wheel option.

Birchwood
02-26-2011, 06:53 PM
I was refering to the GVWR of 1 tons in general old and new .But yes the new Ford do have a high GVWR.

rustyshakelford
02-26-2011, 09:25 PM
If you can afford all that then buy the 3500 GMC.........

i think rockitman is not looking at the gmc/chevrolets because they are hard to come by down here. Not to mention the dodges are almost 10k less than the gm and fords

brett

TandT
02-27-2011, 12:21 AM
You are going to love the 2011, it is a sweet truck. There is not a 5th wheel on the market that the new F350 Dually can't pull legally with plenty of room to spare. The person who posted the 11000-12000 GVWR is wrong, the GVWR on the new F350 is 13,300 pounds, with a payload of over 5000 pounds. That truck is going to barely squat when you hook up even the largest tri axle trailer. You really don't need the 450, your mileage will suffer as it has higher gear rations.

As for your urea, this is a proven technology that has been out there for years. I wouldn't touch the Dodge technology as it has a catalyst that has a finite life span (like a catalytic convertor) that is going to be a heck of a lot more expensive than the $40 a year you spend on urea. It is the same technology that Mercedes uses in its Bluetec diesels and BMW in theirs, along with pretty much every over the road truck built after 2010. Dodge even uses it in their cab and chassis configuration. Bottom line is that it works great, is proven technology and super cheap.

As for the number of trucks on the road, that stat is laughable that Ram has more. The numbers are staggering. Ram is a distant third and losing market share at an alarming rate to Ford and GM. Ford is selling 30K Super Duties per month and the GMs are selling fast too. Ram has sold 250K Rams since 2007, when their 6.7 came out. Ford has sold that many in its first year of production and now accounts for 50% of the HD truck market. Maybe there is a Ram plant in Yuma or something. Enjoy your new truck, it will be a blast!

I coulda' had a V8...... Didn't need it though. :-)

ultrafarmer
02-27-2011, 07:06 AM
I have a Ram and pull our 18,000 lb. Cyclone all over this nation and am going to Alaska this summer. The truck works great with the camper. I have noticed also all the Rams pulling out west, must be the mountains. My 3500 has the 6 speed automatic with jake brake and it works great on those big hills. I have had Ram's since 1994 and not one was in the shop, good luck with your decision .........................

porthole
02-27-2011, 10:06 AM
As for your urea, this is a proven technology that has been out there for years. I wouldn't touch the Dodge technology as it has a catalyst that has a finite life span (like a catalytic convertor) that is going to be a heck of a lot more expensive than the $40 a year you spend on urea. It is the same technology that Mercedes uses in its Bluetec diesels and BMW in theirs, along with pretty much every over the road truck built after 2010. Dodge even uses it in their cab and chassis configuration. Bottom line is that it works great, is proven technology and super cheap.


The new Ford also has a catalyst – that can fail the same as every other catalytic converter out there. There is also a DPF - Diesel Particulate Filter, which requires maintenance. The filter and clog prematurely and eventually WILL clog and require replacement, 120,000 – 240,000 miles

From the Ford books
The Ford 6.7L Power Stroke® V8 Turbo Diesel engine uses industry proven technology and innovative Ford strategies to meet the latest federal emissions standards to reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) levels by more than 80% compared to previous regulations.



COMBUSTION EFFICIENCY: The process begins in the engine, where combustion is optimized to help reduce emissions from the start.
CLEANING AND HEATING: When the exhaust stream enters the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), the hydrocarbons in it are converted and oxidized into water and carbon dioxide. Then things start heating up.



KNOCKING OUT THE NOx: Next, the exhaust stream is dosed with diesel exhaust fluid (DEF), a mixture of urea and water. In the process, the NOx in the exhaust stream is converted into inert nitrogen and water.



SCRUBBING AWAY THE SOOT: Finally, the diesel particulate filter (DPF) traps any remaining soot, which is then periodically burned away.



DOING YOUR PART: The fluid in the 5-gallon DEF reservoir is approximately consumed over the course of each oil change interval. To help make it easy for you to refill, the blue DEF fill cap is located right next to your green diesel fuel cap. The message center alerts you when there’s about 800 miles worth of DEF remaining. Ford-approved DEF can be purchased from your Ford Dealer or other authorized retailers.



Filter service/maintenance
Over time a slight amount of ash will build up in the DPF which is not removed during the regeneration process. The DPF may need to be removed for ash cleaning at approximately 120,000 miles (193,000 km) or greater (actual mileage can vary greatly depending upon
engine/vehicle operating conditions) and replaced with a new or remanufactured (ash cleaned) part. The filter may need to be replaced at approximately 250,000 miles (400,000 km) depending upon engine/vehicle operating conditions. In both cases the engine control system will set a service light to inform you to bring the vehicle to the dealer for service.

Warnerelli
02-27-2011, 04:53 PM
As always with this particular question there are many opinions and I am about to add mine. I recently purchased a 2011 GMC 2500HD Duramax/Allison Crew cab 4X4 Sierra. Even though I am fond of the GM product I researched all three makes. 2011 models of the Dodge, Ford and GM are very compatible in towing capabilities these days. The biggest change all three made is towing capacities . . . the minimums have been increased big time. They have really beefed these 2011's up and GM is now right up there with Ford and Dodge if not a bit more. I do not think you can go wrong with either make and it now really comes down to personal preference. My other truck was a Chevrolet 2500 HD and I loved the Duramax/Allison combination. So my personal preference was to stay with this combination in the 2011. I can tell you that the numbers reflected in these posts are indicative of earlier model trucks. Speaking from an informed viewpoint with my recent research the 2011 GM 2500/3500's Diesels, depending on the bed, cab and 2WD/4WD configuration, bring to the table a minimum of 15,600 lbs. (2500HD Long Box 4x4) and a maximum of 21,700 lbs. (3500HD Big Dooley Long Box 4X4) of fifth wheel trailering capability. My 2500HD with Crew Cab, Standard Box 4X4 is rated at 16,700.