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murry135
08-03-2011, 08:04 AM
OK, now that I seem to have shaken all the bugs free from my BH I am ready to put together a traveling or emergency traveling repair kit so I am looking for recommendations on necessary tools so I don't bring everything I own plus the kitchen sink. Looking to keep weight load down. I have a set of 1/2" impact sockets (7pcs), breaker bar, hand tools, small 3/8" sockets kit and metric socket kit, 10 ton cylinder jack, star style hand lug wrench, rechargeable drill and skill saw, small tire compressor and AC/DC electrical testing units.
What should I add or change out? Should I carry a larger compressor which is AC operated for impact gun that I should also add? My trailer wheighs is at about 12K and I am towing with a Ford F250 Diesel 2002 which weighs in at 6,500lbs w/o trailer hitched. Ford GWR 8800 lbs and the BH is 14k.:confused:

lmcclure
08-03-2011, 08:41 AM
I have a socket set with wrenches, screwdrivers with star patterns, assorted pliers, wire strippers, elect. connectors, fuses, battery powered drill, screwdriver, and Impact tool. I also have a small huskey compressor as I have air bags and a small pontoon boat for fly fishing. 6 ton jack and various electrical cords. All in all I have probably 125 lbs of weight, but we are full time and travel year round.

codycarver
08-03-2011, 08:46 AM
Aside from the items you've listed I keep:

road side warning reflectors, Overalls, mechanics gloves, safety glasses, jack stands, torque wrench, wire, cutters/stripers, quick connectors, crimpers, electrical tape, fuse's, duct tape, utility knife, air pressure gauge, brake adjusting spoon, complete set of wrenches, screwdrivers, sockets, vise grips 3 lbs. sledge, 16 oz hammer, red lock tight, Teflon tape, flash light, caulking, dicor nuts, bolts, screws

I'm sure there are things I've left out but this is my "road side emergence kit" I have also have a basic "when I get to where I'm going" kit also.

I continue to add as I think of things or if I find I need something I buy one and add it to my kit.

Ricoh
08-03-2011, 08:47 AM
I carry an AC compressor with 50 ft roll up hose, complete set of sockets , pliers, vice grips, multi blade screwdrivers, 1/2" impact sockets and a torque wrench, framing hammer, 2 bottle jacks.

Rick

JohnDar
08-03-2011, 08:49 AM
I've added the tools and a few spare brass fittings to repair PEX plumbing, including a short length of 1/2" PEX pipe. In my electrical kit, I have spare fuses, some 14 ga. wire, butt joint connectors and assorted wire nuts. I have a 12V Viair compressor that will fill my 110 psi tires that rides in the back of the truck in a milk crate, with 50ft of hose. Bottle jacks, star lug wrench, 1/2" drive ratchet are also in a tool box in the truck. Since we commute to our site, I've taken to bringing along my combo 18V Bosch drill/driver and impact driver set back and forth, with accessories for it. And I have a two-drawer tool box with a variety of tools in it to cover just about any hand operation. I also keep a collection of various screws, nuts, bolts, washers, and other small fasteners in old medicine vials in the tool box. I'll bring additional "special" tools from home if I know (plan) I'll be working on something specific.

If I don't have something, there are places within 30 minutes or less that I can get it.

wdk450
08-03-2011, 08:57 AM
I would add some hardware to the tools. Small sheet metal screws, and bolts/nuts assortments (WalMart has some nice ones), couple of rolls of duct tape, a couple of rolls of silicon self bonding (rescue or miracle) tape for fluid leaks, RV Goop elastometric adhesive, a 1/2 inch sealing metal clamp for hydraulic line leaks (the hydraulic lines are 3/8 O.D., but this smallest clamp you can find should work with the rescue tape), electrical contact spray, super glue, extra hydraulic fluid for the slides. Some people with broken springs, axle problems, have been able to limp into civilization with the springs/axles chained up, so maybe some chain.

brianharrison
08-03-2011, 09:46 AM
A tube of Dicor Lap Sealant for EPDM roof repair.

Brian

TomMar
08-03-2011, 10:16 AM
Everyone else has given you a pretty good list so I will just comment on what I found missing the first time I had a problem. Get you several of the small, square nosed screwdriver bits that fit the screws on every panel. While a phillips will work most of the time, the right tip works better. I even include a 1/4" nut driver handle for the times the 18v drill is dead.

JohnDar
08-03-2011, 10:37 AM
A #2 square drive bit works in the RV screws. A handy little set is available at HD, made by Husky, that has a small ratchet and a screwdriver handle. Comes with a variety of bits and small sockets. Doesn't take up a lot of space in the tool box.

Geonkat
08-03-2011, 11:21 AM
Plastic zip ties are handy for tying things up. They saved my bacon once on a camper when I suffered a broken awning support arm. I was able to tie it together until I got home.

George

davidg
08-03-2011, 01:40 PM
Cheater pipe 24" to 36" long that will fit over your lug wrench, had shoulder surgery several yrs ago and while on the road needed to change a tire being a one arm man at that time could not loosen lug nuts, DW was able to do it with the cheater pipe.
David

brianharrison
08-03-2011, 01:45 PM
Get you several of the small, square nosed screwdriver bits that fit the screws on every panel. While a phillips will work most of the time, the right tip works better. I even include a 1/4" nut driver handle for the times the 18v drill is dead.

Called a Robertson. Canadian inventor P.L. Roberston. Prevalent here in Canada - less so in the US.

Robertson refused to license out the manufacturing to anyone else so Henry Ford chose not to use it on the Model T, even though it saved a ton of time putting the cars together on the assembly line. My tidbit for the day.

I prefer it over the Phillips head, less chance of stripping when using a power drill/screwdriver, or removing a stuck screw.

More manufacturers are using them to reduce install time

Take care,
Brian

hoefler
08-03-2011, 05:34 PM
Compact 110 volt compressor capable of 150 psi, 18 volt Dewalt 1/2" impact gun, impact driver, small 1850 watt generator ( don't have a big one installed yet ), a selection of screws, bolts, nuts, washers, wire ends, fittings, and such. In addition of what many have suggested.

SilverRhino
08-03-2011, 06:09 PM
Maybe I missed these being mentioned......Good multi meter and a 12 volt test light, in addition to all the other good recommendations already given.

Travel Safe!

P.S. I also carry a spare serpentine belts ( one for with AC the other in case of AC problems ), tensioner pulley, fuel filter & oil filter for the tow vehicle.

TXBobcat
08-03-2011, 07:08 PM
What about a torque wrench, clicker type. Also a deep socket to use with it.

BC

JohnDar
08-03-2011, 09:54 PM
What about a torque wrench, clicker type. Also a deep socket to use with it.

BC

Full-timers probably have a more extensive list of "specialty" tools to keep on hand than us some-timers or seasonal types. Someone like me has the luxury of leaving some tools out of the rig and can bring them along on the next visit to it, if they're needed. Some things can even be built or prepped at home and brought up for final assembly/installation, along with any special tools needed for the project.

A man can never have too many tools, but he can have too much weight in his basement. Once you go around your rig and have a good look at it, you can start to judge just which tools you'll need to accomplish most minor repairs. One of my true "go to" tools is actually a multi-tip screw driver I picked up at the check-out aisle. It's got two Phillips, two small Torx drivers, two flat blades, and I added a short #2 Robertson to it. The tips sit in the hollow handle and it's only four inches long.

wyleyrabbit
08-03-2011, 10:39 PM
Plastic zip ties are handy for tying things up. They saved my bacon once on a camper when I suffered a broken awning support arm. I was able to tie it together until I got home.

I second the suggestion for zap-straps (as we call 'em up here). We once broke our gearbox housing for our front landing gear, and were able to zap strap it together enough to get the trailer hooked up to the truck, and get us home. We have since replaced the gearbox, and all is well.

wyleyrabbit
08-03-2011, 10:49 PM
WD-40, liquid wrench, silicon spray lube, black rust spray paint, caulking gun and a couple of different caulks, Great Stuff spray foam. A toolbox with a selection of tools.

TedS
08-04-2011, 09:13 AM
I carry two square (Robertson) screw drive sizes because throughout the trailer Heartland used two different sizes.

murry135
08-04-2011, 09:26 AM
Thanks for all your responses and ideas. Reading through your post I find I have most of the smaller items already in my BH or TV. Missing other so called bigger items and items I never even thought about. Will start working on my 2011 Xmas list now for those larger items and will try my best to be a good boy for the "Fat Jolly Man."
Keep them coming because, "He who dies with the most toys wins":rolleyes:

JohnDar
08-04-2011, 09:39 AM
I carry two square (Robertson) screw drive sizes because throughout the trailer Heartland used two different sizes.

That Husky combo set I mentioned has both, along with a bunch of other bits. Looking around my rig, they're all #2 heads.

porthole
08-04-2011, 09:10 PM
I've added the tools and a few spare brass fittings to repair PEX plumbing, including a short length of 1/2" PEX pipe.

John - that PEX stuff is fairly tough - have you ever had to do a "not at home repair"?
I have been adding PEX where I can in the trailer. Just replacing my fresh water tanks now and replacing as much of the water hoses with PEX that I can, even the vent lines.

JohnDar
08-04-2011, 09:33 PM
Duane, so far the only PEX repair I've had to do was while it was at the storage yard. But that's still 10 miles from home. OK, Home Depot is across the street from the yard. But it all fits in a small tool box I had sitting empty in the garage at home and the four foot length of PEX rides behind the basement wall. I bought a cutter just for the PEX, along with the crimp and removal tools and spare fittings.

Even if I never need it again, I just might run into someone else that might. Always willing to lend a hand.

jmgratz
08-05-2011, 11:35 AM
I carry some small limb cutters to trim back the tree branches that rub the RV roof and slides. I also carry a small hand saw for the same reason. I have used them both many times. A military entrenching tool (folding shovel) is also a handy addition.

traveler44
08-07-2011, 12:37 AM
Do you have an allen wrench socket and extension to fit the end of the hydraulics motor. You have to remove a sticker on the end of the motor to find the place to drive the slides in and out manually. I keep that socket and extension and a socket to fit the lugnuts seperate from the rest of my tools. I just use the bottle jack from my truck and a block of wood under the axle at the ubolts to raise one wheel and that's all I work on at a time. I carry an accu-tire tire gauge and an infrared digital heat gauge that I shoot at the tires and brakes on the truck and trailer when we stop to make sure everything is running cool. Tom M.

porthole
08-07-2011, 11:30 AM
If you do carry an Allen to run the pump, have you actually tried it?
I needed to cut mine down until I just had a stub sticking out of the drill because of clearance.