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navypoppop
05-13-2012, 09:20 AM
Good morning everyone!
We are just about ready to order our new Greystone 33Qs to be pulled by a new Chevrolet Extended Cab 2500 and aren't sure about the full time rving scene. We plan on picking up the coach in Indiana and pulling it to Ozark, Al. for permanent parking. We will make occasional trips to Florida to see grandchildren and then back to Al.
Any information on full time rving, what to expect, how long will a 5th wheel's lifetime be not counting normal wear outs of appliances etc. would be of the utmost help in our new lifestyle choice. We have had a travel trailer for over 10 years but were seasonal campers only and not living in the coach. Also we are undecided about diesel versus gasoline engines as the $8000 plus additional cost upfront would hurt at this point. Besides I only know how to drive one and not maintain one. I know the trade in value would be greater and the mileage would be better but without traveling about it really wouldn't matter too much.
We appreciate any and all responses to aid in our new choice of living. Our contact information is:
Harry & Jill Hindley[navygrandparents]
228 Stoney Branch
Seaford, De. 19973
hhin170583@aol.com
Thank you so much everyone for any help, navypoppop

kakampers
05-13-2012, 09:30 AM
We've lived in our unit for five years now...just like a house, you MUST maintain it. So far the appliances, etc., are holding up just fine. The only thing replaced was been the Apollo Micro/Convection oven...it last 4 years. Most of our maintenance and repairs have been on the running gear, i.e., axles, brakes, springs, hangers, tires, rims, etc., but we've put close to 70K miles on this rig...sitting permanently is not what we like. We have, however, in the last two years sat for 6 months at a time.

We have updated the inside with new flooring and carpet, not because we had to, but because we wanted to. In our opinion, these units can last indefinitely...it depends on how you use them and how well you maintain them...and that includes washing, waxing, repair caulk, inspecting roof, etc., etc...

After thirty years of RVing and 7 years of fulltiming...we've come to the conclusion that the components in an RV actually last longer with regular use...you might have to fix a drawer of tighten something now and again, but everything works as good or better than the day we bought it...

Gizzy
05-13-2012, 10:08 AM
Kakampers pretty much answered your coach questions. I can only respond to the tow vehicle info. We had a travel trailer that we pulled with a gasser and it seemed to work pretty hard. If you are never going to go anywhere except from AL to FL then perhaps you could get by w/o a diesel.
When we decided we wanted to upgrade to a 5th wheel we bought a truck first and it was a diesel. The difference between gas and diesel was amazing. We took a trip to the northwest and Canada last summer and would never been able to make it w/o a diesel.
I too was nervous about getting a diesel, but now I wonder why I waited so long. Everyone I spoke with about diesel's said the same thing, "Keep the filters clean and you should never have any problems". Get one, take care of it, and you will not regret it. I can not imagine ever going back to a gasser.

jmgratz
05-13-2012, 07:50 PM
I can say the same thing about having a Diesel. I did not know anything about one but it is easy to learn. As has been said, do the routine maintenance and it will last much longer than a gasoline engine. And they have more power. Granted the price of diesel fuel is higher but in the long run you will be better off with the diesel and the new diesels are quieter and cleaner than the older ones.

ILH
05-13-2012, 08:23 PM
I can provide a bit of insight on this. Until this spring I pulled a 34' TT with a 2007 Suburban. In anticipation of buying a 5th wheel tbis year, I bought a new 2011 GMC 2500 with diesel. The difference pulling the TT was absolutely amazing!

What's even more interesting is that my brother also has a 5th wheel and tows it with a 2500 gasser (roughly the same truck otherwise). Having been in his truck while he tows, you really notice how much harder it works - even for reasonably simple tasks.

Bottom line, I'm really happy I got the diesel.

TXTiger
05-13-2012, 09:44 PM
I am looking at making a purchase of a 5er in the next few days. I had a Ford F-150 5.6L V-8 (pulled a boat with no problem). I traded it in for a new 2012 F-350 6.7 diesel to pull the 5er. My gas millage with my F-150 was about 14MPG. I am getting about 16/18MPG city and 18/20/22 highway with the F-350 (not towing). Diesel prices are still higher than regular gas but lower that premium. I feel that the difference in gas/diesel cost is so insignificant and the towing power so much greater in a diesel it is worth the extra $$$ to buy a diesel tow vehicle and the newer diesels are much quieter.

FRANKV
05-14-2012, 12:57 AM
If you want to save some money, consider buying a new 2011, some dealers still have them and you get a better deal. Re: diesel vs gas, if you figure the higher gas mileage and resale value, the diesel may be cheaper in the long run, especially if you put on a lot of miles. Repairs can be costly, though. Buying gently used would save money and may let you afford the diesel, just be sure to check it out carefully and do your research.

You may want to reconsider the size of the truck though. I'm not familiar with the Greystone specs, but check the payload rating of the truck vs the hitch weight. Don't forget the RV will be heavier when loaded, especially for full timers, and you have to include passengers and cargo in the payload for the truck.

ILH
05-14-2012, 06:05 AM
Diesel prices are still higher than regular gas but lower that premium. I feel that the difference in gas/diesel cost is so insignificant and the towing power so much greater in a diesel it is worth the extra $$$ to buy a diesel tow vehicle and the newer diesels are much quieter.

I don't want to take this thread off topic, but an interesting observation is that here in Ontario, diesel is less expensive than gasoline (around $0.30/gallon) - at least during the summer months. During the winter, heating fuel apparently 'crowds out' production at the refineries and dives up the cost of diesel. Even then, it's not alot more than gasoline.

jmgratz
05-14-2012, 08:10 AM
If you are looking for a 2010 F350 FX4 Dually 6.4 Liter in great shape the dealer where I bought my new truck is selling my 2010 I traded. The have it listed for $42000. It is Hillcrest Ford in Huntsville, Tx. The only reason I traded it in was I wanted the 6.7 liter engine. BTW the 2010 is a King Ranch longbed.

brlr2000
05-14-2012, 03:05 PM
I would definitely consider the deisel, but would NEVER consider buying a new one. If you look, you will be able to find a used vehicle for much, much less. IMO, you are throwing away money on a new truck. Just make sure to have the truck inspected by a qualified mechanic before you purchase. I bought a 2006 (last year) with only 22,000 miles on it. As you know, the engine is barely broken in yet. As with any vehicle, you will always need to check hoses, brakes, batteries, fluids, etc. If your concerned about warranty, you can always buy an extended factory warranty. Happy Trails.

Birchwood
05-14-2012, 05:30 PM
We've lived in our unit for five years now...just like a house, you MUST maintain it. So far the appliances, etc., are holding up just fine. The only thing replaced was been the Apollo Micro/Convection oven...it last 4 years. Most of our maintenance and repairs have been on the running gear, i.e., axles, brakes, springs, hangers, tires, rims, etc., but we've put close to 70K miles on this rig...sitting permanently is not what we like. We have, however, in the last two years sat for 6 months at a time.

We have updated the inside with new flooring and carpet, not because we had to, but because we wanted to. In our opinion, these units can last indefinitely...it depends on how you use them and how well you maintain them...and that includes washing, waxing, repair caulk, inspecting roof, etc., etc...

After thirty years of RVing and 7 years of fulltiming...we've come to the conclusion that the components in an RV actually last longer with regular use...you might have to fix a drawer of tighten something now and again, but everything works as good or better than the day we bought it...
I agree with you that the RV works better with regular use.Leaving an Rv in a snow bank for 6 months is what does them in.
We have been in our Landmark full time for three years and I am very inpressed by its durability.As you stated there
are always things to tighten but its expected with traveling.Its difficult to suggest to a new full timer what is the best approach
when starting out because no two people are the same.In our case we travel only two months in the southern US and set at a
park in Florida for 4 months and another park in Canada for 4 months .Two months are spent setting at our kids dooryards.
Cost to fulltime is also difficult to predict untill you actually do it for a couple years.In our case we overspent the first year
but the last two years have been good.