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dcsynthetics
01-30-2013, 11:26 AM
Anybody have views on energy efficiency on switching from single pane to dual pane windows? We are in cold weather alot and have to use a LOT of utilities for heating.
Do the dual panes keep the heat in any better ? ?

Dick Callahan
2011 Bighorn 3600
dcsynthetics@hotmail.com

TandT
01-30-2013, 11:45 AM
IMHO, dual panes do help. Although the R value is not shown as being much, I believe they do noticeably reduce cold/hot transfer to the inside of the rig.

No condensation either. They also reduce noise levels. I like our dual panes and will never have another rig without them.

Don't know about the cost of "switching". When we ordered our rig, as I recall it was about $900 more.

Another thing some folks do is to use a storm type plexiglass panel on the inside of the window frame. If you google that option, I believe you will find info on it. Trace

blong
01-30-2013, 12:39 PM
We also have dual panes and agree, outside noise is noticably reduced compared to our previous rigs without them. And a lot cooler inside in the summer time, no experience with cold, r value, or the cost of converting.. one thing to be aware of is that it does up your trailer weight.
Also agree, we will never own another rig without them.

For20hunter
01-30-2013, 01:15 PM
Has anyone done this window swap after they purchased their fifth wheel? Looking for an idea of what it costs? We have a BH3585RL and would love to switch ours out too if the cost is not too bad.

cookie
01-30-2013, 05:49 PM
I recall that someone, years ago, either did the swap or inquired about it. I think the price would have been several thousand dollars. Five is the number that comes to mind.

Peace
Dave

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Birchwood
01-30-2013, 07:43 PM
Don't know about the heat loss but unless you enjoy wiping condensation from the inside of your windows
switch to dual pane or just switch to a suitable RV for your application

For20hunter
01-30-2013, 08:37 PM
i recall that someone, years ago, either did the swap or inquired about it. I think the price would have been several thousand dollars. Five is the number that comes to mind.

Peace
dave

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ouch!!!!

stevebotts
02-01-2013, 09:58 AM
We had dual pane on our previous Bighorn. Did not get them this time. We have not noticed any difference in noise or cold but we do not RV in weather much below freezing and only then for brief periods in the early AM. I was concerned about condensation but so far (7 months now) we have had none. Maybe just the weather we are in. The cost for aftermarket installation is high and also you might consider the additional weight. It is quite a bit.

sengli
02-01-2013, 10:08 AM
We just ordered, and bought our new big horn. We had this conversation with the engineering people at heartland. They said the R factor of dual pane windows is .07. And since all current windows are encased in aluminum frames, the cold is still xferred thru them. Basically they flat out said off the record of course, that the dual panes were a very poor investment. The additional cost of approximately $1400, plus they added about 250lbs to the coach. We ended up making removable window shades from that bubble/foil stuff and it has an R factor of 14 value. I know there are alot of people who will dis-agree, but this info came from the they guys who build these coaches.

TravelTiger
02-01-2013, 10:19 AM
Interesting info, good to know!

Having camped in really cold weather with single panes, the windows do sweat and moisture can freeze, even on the inside.
23032
(Inside frost!)

Dual panes would prevent this. Since we like to stay in colder climes for skiing, we will have them on our next rig. I think they would also help some when the temp is high (100+ in the Texas summer.)


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cookie
02-01-2013, 10:20 AM
I know there are alot of people who will dis-agree, but this info came from the they guys who build these coaches.
The only problem I see with this is that although they build em, they don't actually use them.

Peace
Dave

boatto5er
02-01-2013, 01:02 PM
Having had both, I would not voluntarily go back to single pane windows.


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Willym
02-02-2013, 08:34 PM
I'll always have dual panes for the lack of condensation and better noise insulation. The R factor thing is all relative. The R factor in the walls isn't that great either. The R14 value quoted for the bubble wrap stuff is a load of malarkey, but it makes for great advertising.

alaska dodge
02-02-2013, 11:28 PM
I have dual pane on my Cyclone 4100 and in Alaska it makes a huge difference. I will always order the dual pane

bill

caissiel
02-02-2013, 11:41 PM
We have DP windows and its much better in cold weather. The inside glass temperature is close to room temperature. All our houses would not be able to survive winter with ice on the inside.
A little R value is better then none because single glass has hardly any. And 2 thickness of glass has twice R value, while 1/4 in of air has an additinal R factor that is quit noticeble. And if the glass feels warm it surely is a benefit. As said before, with no sweating it surely is a benefit.
We had constant water running down the walls with previuos unit now we feel warm all over with the furnace running.
Its about 40 degree difference and it can benenefit greatly.
Its DP for us and well worth the price if keeping the unit, but will never get it back on trade due to the bad rap rumered around the dealers.

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