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View Full Version : Love the 32RLTS but not sure about towing



JTown55
08-20-2013, 06:44 PM
We love the 32RLTS travel trailer features and are having a hard time find anything we like as much that weighs less. We have a Ford F150 SuperCrew 5.0L and 3.55 rear axle ratio. Max trailer weight is 8000 lbs and GCWR is 13,500. We will get an equalizer hitch and sway bars. Dry weight is listed at 6950 lbs but with options weighs about 7400. We will be using for weekend trips and some week long trips. Our mechanic said it would be fine since we won't be loading it up or carrying water. What do you all think? We really don't want to shop for another truck but we sure do love those opposing slides!

danemayer
08-20-2013, 07:34 PM
Hi JTown55,

Welcome to the Heartland Owners Forum. This is a great place to get answers from experienced owners.

Towing capacity, or ability to move xxx pounds forward is one consideration. Vertical weight on the hitch is another. Based on the 32RLTS gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR), you could easily be overweight, creating safety issues and excess wear and tear on the F150. For example, you might find that you're running your engine at high RPMs for long periods to develop enough HP to tow the trailer.

Steep grades could present a problem as well. Most of the time, we're worried about getting up the hill, but going down can be much more problematic. While the trailer brakes are responsible for handling the trailer weight, if you ever find yourself going down a steep grade with trailer brakes not working at 100%, life could get very exciting.

If you actually can manage to keep the trailer weight within the truck's capabilities, maybe you'll be ok.

You can work through the weight issues with detailed worksheets at Fifth Wheel Safe Towing ( (http://fifthwheelst.com/)which also covers travel trailers).

JTown55
08-21-2013, 07:20 AM
Do you feel like even 7200 lbs is pushing it?

danemayer
08-21-2013, 07:30 AM
Do you feel like even 7200 lbs is pushing it?
If your truck is rated at 8000 lbs and you're towing less than that, you should be ok. It's just very easy to end up with more weight than anticipated.

pegmikef
08-21-2013, 08:16 AM
When I towed my NT 26LRSS (about the same weight) with my F150 Crew Cab, I felt that it was kind of marginal. Not from a safety or sway standpoint, but from a power standpoint and gas consumption. I got tired of watching the tac run at 4 to 5 k RPM when climbing moderate grades. Moved up to an F250 diesell and it was a world of difference and MPG improved 2 to 4 miles per gallon.

Saildogs
08-21-2013, 09:29 AM
We upgraded from a F150 to a F250 diesel. There is a world of difference towing our trailer that weighs 6900 fully loaded. The 150 did the job but not as easily and towing up grades was a nail biter at high rpm's and the gas pedal mashed to the floor. I think that trailer is too much for the 150 to handle comfortably.

oldmannj
08-21-2013, 04:24 PM
I have a 6 liter GMC 2500 sierra with 3:73 rears, pulling a 28RKS Trailrunner . Although my rig is heavier it isn't a great amount. With the 3:55's your RPM's will be elevated nearly all the time. The ratio doesn't allow me to keep road speed on even a slight grade. With the smaller motor and taller gears I think you're in for at least as much trouble as I have. With that said, I know Ford is more truck than most it might work for you. Give it a shot! Worst it can cost is a newer used truck. ED

priorguy
08-21-2013, 08:04 PM
My 5.0L F150 pulls my 28BRS fine but I have the 3:73 gear and 9300lbs towing. The trailer sticker is 5720lbs. Leaves almost 3600lbs margin. The only difference between the trucks is the axel. Tranny, transfer case (4X4 only) and brakes are the same. Load the family and some gear in the truck and weigh it. Subtract from the gross combined weight and see what wiggle room you have.

FYI the base weight for a 4x4 s.crew short bed is 5200lbs so you have 8300lbs for passengers, trailer, and gear. Add 300lbs for 2WD.

berky
08-24-2013, 06:09 PM
That optioned dry weight does not include the weight of a battery, propane, and obviously personal belongings. You'd be surprised how little it will take to get you to 8000#.

My guess is that with an 8000# tow rating you have a 4-spd transmission. If that's the case, you'll be pulling most hills in 2nd gear with the engine screaming at 4500 RPM. Your tongue weight will be 900#-1000#, and most Class IV hitches are rated for no more than 1000#. With that hitch weight, 2 passengers, and a fulk tank of gas, you'll be maxing your truck's payload.

Many here have been in the position of towing maybe 90% of what you are looking at with a 1/2 ton truck. And after a year or so, many of us have moved up to more truck. If you really like the 32RLTS floor plan, then get the most enjoyment out of it by including a truck upgrade in your plans.

JTown55
08-25-2013, 05:26 PM
If we upgrade to a different truck, we'd like to be able to stay with a truck that fits in our garage. Is the f150 6.2L with 3.73 ratio a good choice to be able to tow what we want and be reasonable to drive around the rest of the time?

Thank you for all of your help. We just don't want to make a mistake!

dhcolesj
08-28-2013, 07:09 AM
I checked with Heartland, because the statement that the tongue weight would be about 900 lbs scared me. The tongue weight as rated is with battery and full LP tanks, so the 32RLTS is only about 630lbs tongue weight, I don't see how you're going to get that to 900. If you balance your loading, and don't run with water (except maybe in the fresh tank, I doubt you're going to get above 730 - 750 lbs max. The average family of 4 will add about 1,000lbs (most don't get above this from what I've found) traveling weight, which puts your camper at around 8,200lbs. (as always your mileage may vary), so that's what I would plan on.

berky
08-28-2013, 06:40 PM
I checked with Heartland, because the statement that the tongue weight would be about 900 lbs scared me. The tongue weight as rated is with battery and full LP tanks, so the 32RLTS is only about 630lbs tongue weight, I don't see how you're going to get that to 900.
Advertised tongue weights will always be a basic TT, without options. My 26LRSS had a brochure tongue weight around 560#, but shipped with a tongue weight of 630#. Most TT's I have seen have the largest storage areas up front, so that 2/3 - 3/4 of the weight put into the storage compartments ends up on the tongue. (The manufacturers do this as good design practice so that loading a trailer increases the tongue weight and improves stability).

After loading my TT my tongue weight ended up at 850#. That's for a TT with a loaded weight of 7200#, a tongue weight of 12%. Carrying water has little impact on tongue weight, since the tanks are generally near the axles. A full tank of fresh water on my 26LRSS only lowers the tongue weight by 30#. All of these tongue weights were measured with a Sherline, so they are reliable.

priorguy
08-28-2013, 06:46 PM
Why not go with the Ecoboost. It has the same tow rating and way better mileage. I believe you need a 4:10 axel with the 6.2L to get the Max tow of 11,300 lbs. A 5.0L like mine is rated for 9300 lbs. Add another 300lbs for 2wd.

Keep in mind that in 2011 all the drivelines (engines,tranny,etc.) and frames were beefed up on the F150. Also, in 2014 the Ram 1500 and Nissan Titan are getting smaller versions of the cummins deisel. You can bet Ford, GM, and Toyota won't be far behind,

And why buy an ultra-light trailer if you need a 3/4 ton diesel to pull it, just get a 5er.

pegmikef
08-28-2013, 07:01 PM
Advertised tongue weights will always be a basic TT, without options. My 26LRSS had a brochure tongue weight around 560#, but shipped with a tongue weight of 630#. Most TT's I have seen have the largest storage areas up front, so that 2/3 - 3/4 of the weight put into the storage compartments ends up on the tongue. (The manufacturers do this as good design practice so that loading a trailer increases the tongue weight and improves stability).

After loading my TT my tongue weight ended up at 850#. That's for a TT with a loaded weight of 7200#, a tongue weight of 12%. Carrying water has little impact on tongue weight, since the tanks are generally near the axles. A full tank of fresh water on my 26LRSS only lowers the tongue weight by 30#. All of these tongue weights were measured with a Sherline, so they are reliable.

. . . and if you boondock and use two Trojan 105s as I did with my 26LRSS then that adds 110 pounds for batteries (instead of about forty for 1 group 27 12 v battery).

Delaine and Lindy
03-11-2014, 08:12 PM
We just happen to have a 2014 North Trail RTLS. And we did have a 2013 Chevy Silverado LTZ 1500 4x4, and towed the RTLS less than 10 miles, just to our home. However owning 6ea 5th Wheels we learned the given weights are almost always wrong. And since we go West to Colorado, Northern New Mexico, I just wanted more Truck. if you have ever pulled the Colorado Rockies, then you know you can never have to much truck. I ordered a 2015 Chevy Silverado, 2500 HO LTZ, 4x4 with a 6 liter and all options. And he standard rear gear is 4.10, and took ownership on Feb. 26th. Haven't towed the RTLS yet, but will be taking a run to Tennessee in April… But I feel very confident the 2500 HO will do fine. We have had several Chevy 3500HD, Duramax with a 3.73 rear gear, and our last Mobile Suites weight came in at 18,900lbs, loaded for our 4 to 8 month trips. I have always felt you can never have to much Truck but you can have to much Trailer.. Keep in mind it isn't always the pulling, but it's stopping the load. Good luck on your choice. Happy Trails…

P.S. We will be going to California this summer and up the Coast to Washington State and back down to Colorado, Northern New Mexico, will leave LA, Lower Alabama in the middle of June and will return back to home base in Oct. Happy Trails..