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Ladiver
05-08-2014, 10:56 PM
I am seriously looking at adding an Magnum Energy inverter/charger to our Cyclone 3100. I have spoken to 2 shops that recommend and install them. The first one recommended the MM1212, but I think the MS2812 would be a better option. One of the dealers had each little part called out with line item pricing (which I really like) but everything seemed to be generic. The other dealer recommended all Magnum stuff and it seemed to be self contained in one unit, with the normal add-ons. So, the list below is what I am looking at. Eventually, we will add a solar panel or two to help charge the battery bank.

29670 29671

MMP250-60S - Mini Magnum Panel (link (http://magnumenergy.com/mmp-series-mini-magnum-panel/))
MS2812 - Interter/Charger (link (http://magnumenergy.com/ms-series/))
ME-ARC - Remote Control (link (http://magnumenergy.com/me-arc50-remote/))
ME-AGS-N - Auto Gen Start (link (http://magnumenergy.com/auto-generator-start-network-me-ags-n/))
ME-BMK - Battery Monitor (link (http://magnumenergy.com/battery-monitor-kit-me-bmk/))
GPL-6CT (qty 2) - Lifeline Batteries, 6v 300 amp hour (link (http://www.lifelinebatteries.com/rvflyer.php?id=15))

I have read many other posts about making sure that the loads are leveled between L1 and L2. I will make sure that the installer does ensure this. I also assume, if I were to wire one of the a/c's to the sub panel and remove the 3-way toggle switch, then I should be able to run all 3 a/c's any way I want???

My biggest concern about the Mini Magnum Panel is what I read in the manual on Page 59:

Appendix B – Using the MMP in a Mobile Application

The MMP Series is designed and approved for use in residential or commercial applications. It has been tested and listed to UL 1741, 2nd Edition (inverters, converters and controllers for use in Independent Power Systems) for use in the US; and is also certified to CSA C22.2 No. 107.1-01 (General Use Power Supplies) for use in Canada. The AC input and output neutral connections in the MMP are combined and are bonded to the internal ground bar. The bond from neutral to ground can be removed as neutral is bonded to ground from the primary AC source.

In a mobile application, the standards for safely wiring RV, truck, and marine installations in the United States requires the neutral and safety ground to be connected at the AC source; whether it is a shorepower feed, an inverter, or a generator. This maximizes the possibility that a circuit breaker will activate if a hotwire-to-ground fault occurs. These standards also require that the AC neutral be connected to safety ground (often called a “bond”) in one, and only one, place at any time. The single bond is established in order to make the electrical panel’s neutral line safe, by connecting it to ground. Without this bond, the neutral can have up to 60 VAC with respect to ground.

Because the neutrals are combined, if the MMP is used in a mobile application, more than one neutral to ground bond may be established, which can cause current to circulate between the multiple neutral to ground connections. This can cause “ground-loop” currents, which can trip GFCI’s, cause an electrical shock hazard, and may be the reason for other annoying side effects.

scottyb
05-09-2014, 07:14 AM
This is a great looking system and one that I have my eyes on. What part concerns you? It says that the neutral - ground bond can be removed in mobile applications. They are bonded at the main shore panel.

Ladiver
05-09-2014, 09:31 AM
Thanks scottyb. I know you have been looking at this for a while now, so I figured you would chime in! I guess I was concerned about the last paragraph where it says "multiple neutral to ground connections...can cause ground-loop" but I completely missed the sentence "the bond from neutral to ground can be removed."

Nevermind! I will go back to my donut and coffee this morning. Now I need to figure out when to do this? I would like to supply all the major parts (listed above) and have the shop do the install (including necessary wiring). Unfortunately, I know just enough about electrical to get "zapped" every once in a while. Electricity scares me, especially at 50 amp!

porthole
05-09-2014, 11:40 AM
Jeff, If you are looking at Magnum, you are looking at the top of the game for recreational use. Why not use ALL magnum ancillary parts then?

MM1212 verus MS2812

You are already looking at considerable expense for "just an inverter". I'd be willing to bet the difference in cost of the two, that if you install the smaller unit, down the road you will be thinking "gee< I really should have installed the larger unit, but it is too much additional expense now"

Keep in mind the efficiency ratings. Magnums are very good, but still only 95% efficient, and that is at a set temperature with properly sized battery banks and supply cables.

The 1212 at 95% is about 1100 watts. If you are following the forum, there may be an issue with smaller inverter running just a residential fridge.
Also, the 1212 is a modified sine wave whereas the 2812 is a pure sine. That is something to think about but not all that critical with quality units. What i mean by that is there is a reason Magnums cost what they do and yet you can go to many stores and buy a 3000 watt inverter for under $300.

Many of your "sensitive" electronics are using some sort of power converter anyway, such as the power bricks for laptops etc.

Keep in mind the minimum wire size as well. Although 2/0 may be what is speced, for a few bucks more you would do quite well to go with 4/0

Just an FYI, I used to run a Heart Interface 2500 watt inverter (same quality - type as the Magnum's) in our first boat. Although the AC unit was smaller then what is on the RV's I had no trouble running it for a while off the batteries and indefinitely as long as the engines were running.

Another FYI, if you have a Progressive EMS - they are not suited for inverter use. So, the inverter would have to be wired after the P-EMS

I don't recall if the the 2812 is a 2 input 2 output or not. But that is something you may want to consider. The flexibility with 2 in/2 out is better.

porthole
05-09-2014, 11:42 AM
And did you know that there is a hybrid model that will allow load sharing?

It uses the inverter as well as an other additional AC sources (such as utility or generator) to supply a sum of the sources for power. May be just the ticket to keep all 3 AC's running.

Ladiver
05-09-2014, 01:50 PM
Thanks for the info Duane. I have heard you guys talking about the Hybrid systems and I think that would be great. Unfortunately, if I wanted to use the Mini Magnum Panel, I would have to use the MSH-RE series inverter. There is only one, and it is the MSH4024RE, which would be way more than what I need. Isn't it recommended to not go too far over your needs? I can handle some overkill, but double? I already think the 2812 would be overkill.

Ugh, now I may want that setup, due to efficiency of the inverter (MS and MSH are the same). Plus it is only a few hundred more than the MS2812 :-/ Where to stop??????

29672

porthole
05-09-2014, 08:57 PM
First I've seen that chart. If the 2812 drops to 80% under max load I wonder what he cheapos do that start at 80%

I don't know about the 2812 being overkill. My preference would be to have about double what I would normally use. Thinking that way, the 2812 is an excellent choice.

aRAYwego
05-09-2014, 11:39 PM
I was one that had the problem with the 1000w inverter running my residential fridge. Heartland authorized a Magnum MS2012 and it works great. Still dont know all the ins n outs of this thing but will after reading up on it.

Ladiver
05-12-2014, 02:39 PM
Duane,

I just spoke with Magnum, and they do not recommend the Mini Magnum Panel for RV use. They said it would have to have some wiring modifications. I have no idea what those would be. ?I guess I need to discuss with the shop that quoted it. They also said the MS2812 is a 2 in/2 out with 30amp each vs. the hybrid which is only 1 in/1 out but 60amp.

You seem to have done your homework. Which do you think would be better? What is the advantage of dual in/out?

porthole
05-12-2014, 05:48 PM
My plan was for the 2 in 2 out as it would allow putting the inverter inline with the AC supply after the transfer switch.

That allows the equivalent of a battery back up for the entire coach and no need for a sub panel. Obviously one has to be aware of the limitations of this method. But it has worked for me in boating.

Ladiver
06-24-2014, 03:25 PM
Well, I finally pulled the trigger. I got all of the Magnum equipment and the shop is doing the install this week!!!! I ended up with the MSH3021M with a Battery Monitor, Auto Gen Start and Advanced Remote Control. I look forward to being able to run on battery and not have to always be plugged in or on generator.

We are taking a trip to Paso Robles for 3 days of wine tasting. We are parking it on a flat plot of land with no hookups. I did not want to be that rude dude running the generator all the time. Now we can have the batteries to help us be good neighbors.

scottyb
06-24-2014, 04:32 PM
Well, I finally pulled the trigger. I got all of the Magnum equipment and the shop is doing the install this week!!!! I ended up with the MSH3021M with a Battery Monitor, Auto Gen Start and Advanced Remote Control. I look forward to being able to run on battery and not have to always be plugged in or on generator.

We are taking a trip to Paso Robles for 3 days of wine tasting. We are parking it on a flat plot of land with no hookups. I did not want to be that rude dude running the generator all the time. Now we can have the batteries to help us be good neighbors.

Nice going. Can't wait to hear how you like it. That would be the dream shot for me. Maybe a couple solar panels and a controller to go with it.

Bohemian
06-24-2014, 05:39 PM
What are the ways to avoid the obvious problem of making a perpetual motion machine that will drain the batteries very quickly, e.g. batteries supply the inverter which makes 110V which supplies the converter which charges the batteries?

scottyb
06-24-2014, 10:38 PM
The inverted power never charges the batteries. The batteries are only charged when generator, shore, or solar power is available.

Jim.Allison
06-25-2014, 03:10 AM
The easiest way to understand the neutral bonding is this. Your fiver is an appliance. On a 50 amp unit you have 4 wires coming in. 120v 120v a neutral and a ground these wires stay separate wherever they go through the rig. The white neutral and the bare copper are never on the same post or bar like you might find in a house. But they do get bonded on the pedestal.

The code states that there can be only one place for bonding, and in our case it is at the pedestal outside the rig.

But in the case of a generator the one place is inside the generator, and in the case of an inverter the one place is inside the inverter. Look at the generator and the inverter as APPLIANCES within an appliance. Just like a drill in your shop or a washer dryer at your house. There is a white neutral, a black hot and a green ground and they stay that way all the way to your breaker box, your fiver is no different.

This was not an issue in the Xantrex that I installed, the Magnum is very similar and I don't think it will be an issue there either. Their installation instructions should be very clear. You should quiz your installer about it and if their eyes glaze over and they cannot explain neutral bonding to you then you need to get another installer. Bonding the neutral within the rig will result in a shock hazard somewhere, somehow, someday.

This should not be an issue but you are right to be vigil about it anyway. Good luck.

Bohemian
06-25-2014, 07:08 AM
Ok, so shore power is run through the generator and bonded there. Then through the inverter and bonded there.

scottyb
06-25-2014, 07:26 AM
Not exactly. Shore power runs through the inverter and the inverter has it's own transfer switch. If you look at LADiver's 1st post in the Magnum diagram on the right, the neutral bond is to be removed if they are bonded at the source, which applies to RV's and boats.

porthole
06-25-2014, 08:18 AM
I ended up with the MSH3021M with a Battery Monitor, Auto Gen Start and Advanced Remote Control.



If your gonna go - go big or go home!

Magnum is still the top notch for recreational use, although pricey, you do get what you pay for and there is a reason the Magnum's cost what they do. Although xantrex is remotely similar, their customer service is way off base and the equipment is not in the same league as Magnum.

Has your installer explained how he is doing the setup? The inverter you listed has a single input / output for the AC service (60 amp).
I wrote to magnum a week or so ago asking for some additional info with installing this unit in a 2 leg / 50 amp service RV and still be able able to maintain the load sharing feature.

My previous Heart Interface inverter was equipped with a 2 in 2 out (30 amp each) configuration and worked similar to a 5500 watt genny install.

Looking forward to your reports.

I am seriously thinking of getting our next trailer without the genny and instead use the funds to go with batteries and inverter, some solar and then rely on my 3000 watt Honda for use when needed.
The load sharing on these intelligent inverters should more then suffice for what our use has been for the past 10 years.

porthole
06-25-2014, 08:23 AM
The inverter listed in your first post has two output breakers, one "bypass" and one "inverter" to supply your panel/s.

The new Magnum appears to have a single 60 amp output breaker.

dave10a
06-25-2014, 09:19 AM
I use the 3kw modified sine wave inverter from Xantrex and it works fine for all my electronics-even the A/C if I want to recharge the batteries soon. Modified SW inverters work well for the stuff on most RV's like refrigerators, air compressors, microwaves,TV's and even air conditioners if you have the power capability. There may be a problem with electric clocks, desk top computer or other electronic that sense zero cross over of the sine wave. I love it when they say don't use modified sine wave for "sensitive electronics" but fail to explain what that really means.

I wired the Xantrex inverter to the transfer switch supplied in the full timers option for a generator. I also have 200 watt solar panels to keep the AGM batteries charged when not connected to shore power. This was the most cost effective way to go for me. However, one needs to be familiar with electrical codes and theory to do it yourself.

Seren
06-25-2014, 09:57 AM
Well, I finally pulled the trigger. I got all of the Magnum equipment and the shop is doing the install this week!!!! I ended up with the MSH3021M with a Battery Monitor, Auto Gen Start and Advanced Remote Control. I look forward to being able to run on battery and not have to always be plugged in or on generator.

We are taking a trip to Paso Robles for 3 days of wine tasting. We are parking it on a flat plot of land with no hookups. I did not want to be that rude dude running the generator all the time. Now we can have the batteries to help us be good neighbors.

Interesting thread, since just starting out fulltiming and still have a lot to learn. Although will not need any of this this year (well, unless Hearthland does not solve the refrig issue), but will be heading out West next year and would like to try some boondocking, so have a couple of questions. (1) What batteries do you have for this setup (12v or 6v, how many)? (2) What is the output watts on this? (3) What generator do you use to keep the batteries charged? (4) What is the approx cost for the complete inverter install?
Finally, a general question, I would assume that the recommendation would be that "occasional" boondocking would only need a generator, but if planning more extensive dry camping, especially out West that solar and a smaller generator would be best. Btw, we have a Landmark, do not have a generator yet, and obviously do not know yet whether we will only "like" boondocking, or will "love" it.
I have learned soooo much from this forum since I bought our Landmark in March, matter of fact if it wasn't for this forum we would not have bought a Heartland! Ok, time to become a member...


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

Ladiver
06-25-2014, 11:50 AM
Seren, I will try and answer your questions.

1. I am using 2 6v Lifeline GPL-6CT batteries. They have a 300 Ah rating, so at 12 volts, I will have about 150Ah to use before charging.
2. The inverter can output 3000 Watts, but can surge up to 3900 Watts (5 sec.).
3. I have the Onan 5500 generator that will recharge as needed. It is wired with an auto gen start, so the generator will fire up if the batteries drop to a certain level, or the temperature inside rises to a certain level.
4. The cost is very dependant on where you buy materials and who installs it. For my setup, I spent about $2400 on the Magnum parts and will have another $1000 or so in installation. So, the total will be around $3500. I did buy the components on-line, as they were much less than the shop wanted for them, but I am paying standard labor rates for the install. If you are capable of doing it yourself, then I think you could do the whole inverter setup for $3000.

Earlier in this thread someone mentioned passing up on the generator. I think I would do that on the next trailer. Take the space and add a two more batteries. Then for recharging, add some solar panels. This would give you plenty of renewable power and be less weight overall than having the generator installed. If you needed a guaranteed power source, carry a small Honda generator for emergency power.

Jim.Allison
06-25-2014, 01:42 PM
NOT if you are using a sub panel. If you are not using a subpanel of some sort then you will obviously have to trip the air conditioner and charger breaker. In a good installation a subpanel is a foregone conclusion.
What are the ways to avoid the obvious problem of making a perpetual motion machine that will drain the batteries very quickly, e.g. batteries supply the inverter which makes 110V which supplies the converter which charges the batteries?

Jim.Allison
06-25-2014, 02:43 PM
BTW Don't forget to keep your receipts because you will get a credit on your income tax for installing solar on your home. As far as I know this is still a legitimate deduction. Tax Credits are always better than deductions.

The following is the information I have, based on a dual in and single out inverter charger. Mine was a Xantrex but a Magnum of the same caliber should be similar.

If you already have a generator you have a transfer switch. Your generator will feed into the transfer switch. The generator should be the default powersource for the transfer switch. Simple. both legs, the neutral and the ground have a place in the transfer switch. The bare wire or the green ground wire will connect to the system there. The output of the transfer switch is what the coach operates off of, regardless of the input source.

*Do not confuse the ground wires being attached to the chassis with the subject of neutral bonding, the bare or green wire will be attached to the chassis in multiple locations and will also attach to the bare ground inside the transfer switch, the factory made it that way so chassis grounds are to be ignored there is no relationship between chassis grounds and neutral bonding.

A neutral bond would occur if you were to put a bare or green ground on a neutral bar or visa versa. You cannot let this happen in your RV. The neutral and ground do eventually get bonded, but only in one place and in the case of pedestal power it happens at the pedestal or in the service box for the pedestal system or even at the pole. The point being it does not happen in your coach.

The shore power is not run through the generator or inverter. The generator and the shore power lines meet at the transfer switch and the transfer switch chooses which powersource to use. The default position of the transfer switch should be the generator, meaning that; if you are on pedestal power and the generator is running the transfer switch will chose the generator to feed the panel/coach.

Up to now nothing has changed, you have two sources of electricity, pedestal or generator. And the transfer switch is defaulted to generator if the generator is running, if not then pedestal power. The sources are indistinguishable to the breaker panel.

Each power source bonds the neutral independently at the source. The code is that there can be only one bonded neutral. In the case of shore power it is at the PEDESTAL.

In the case your your generator, the neutral is bonded in the generator, thereby meeting the code.

Your inverter neutral is bonded in the inverter, thereby meeting the code again.

You must view your coach as an appliance, plugged in at the RV park. Just like your drill motor you keep in the garage, there is a HOT wire, an NEUTRAL wire and a ground wire. They stay separated all the way through your extension cord to your household breaker box, it is there that the ground and neutral are bonded. NOT within the appliance.

Each, the generator and the Inverter are separate power sources and when they are making AC electricity as a source their neutrals are bonded with the ground within them.

Now ADDING the inverter you will or should install a subpanel. Progressive makes a split panel in a configuration that you need. Its a good product in that it fits exactly where your current panel is now, so you dont have to cut another hole for a subpanel. The benefit of adding a sub panel rather than a split panel is that you will have additional room for breakers. My split panel used all the breaker slots so there is no room for additional breakers in mine. So its a matter of preference and I might be sorry for not choosing to install a subpanel, right now the split panel is great. I will refer to the split panel or subpanel as a subpanel from now on.

Installing the inverter; because you cannot run air conditioners or your aux charger off the inverter then neither will be on the subpanel circuits. You have to look at everything you want the inverter to run for you when you are inverting. I can't remember all the circuits or breakers I put on subpanel but you can make that decision fairly easily, I think that I put everything except the aux charger, 120v water heater, air conditioners and other big power consumers. It was well balanced when I was finished. The microwave is the largest appliance on the subpanel. *as a side note the microwave does work but the Borgart Trimetric will show you the reason that you can not use it for more than 2 to 3 minutes, it is a serious power hog.

So doing this you will feed the inverter with 120v from each of your main breakers (dual input), then (in my case) you will pass through 120v and 30 amp back to the sub panel from the inverter (single 30 amp output.) This is your passthrough line, no matter the source of your electricity (gen or shore), you will be feeding 2 120v 30 amp lines, a neutral and a ground (regardless of phase) into the inverter unit and will output 120v and 30 amps to the subpanel. At this point nothing has changed for you except you have an inverter being fed by 2 120v legs, one from each of your main breakers, each main breaker is still feeding the air conditioning systems. The inverter now has two legs from which to choose power from. Configured like this it should automatically balance the draw as a call is made from the subpanel. Your inverter will not charge while inverting but if you have an aux charger it should be on your primary panel NOT your subpanel otherwise your inverter will be running your aux charger unless the breaker is off, i took my OEM charger out and put it in my garage, I sometimes think that i should have left it in, but like I said I don't have room for another breaker in the split panel, if you use a subpanel you will have room in your original primary panel for such a breaker.

Your inverter has an internal transfer switch, by default it uses the input, when no input is available then the inverter will operate otherwise it will not. Now when you start inverting, your inverter will only feed the sub panel. Mine easily operates everything connected to the sub panel.

Now lets go back to shore power or generator power, and lets say you are running your generator and the air conditioners are working full time AND your inverter/ charger is charging, you can hear the generator lugging now and then because two compressors kicked in at the same time, and the microwave was running. Your inverter will sense the current drop (in a split second) relieve the most loaded leg on the main panel and then feed the sub panel circuits, (not the airconditioner circuits) in this case the microwave. If its not enough the inverter will supplement the subpanel with inverted power thereby relieving main panel even further as a result the generator is also given an opportunity to catch up to load for a moment until it can wind up and take the whole load again. This system is not assisting the generator but rather temporarily unloading the main panel and the generator by outputting inverted power to the subpanel. This scenario applies to both shore and generator power as the main panel cannot distinguish between generator or pedestal power. Theoretically the shore power should not require this action, but might.

One thing you should keep in mind is that neither your generator or your inverted power are a concern as far as quality of electricity. Your EMS only needs to check the pedestal power for faulty wiring or what ever may be wrong with the pedestal. Your generator and inverter will always be wired correctly and need not be checked by the EMS, I recommend a permanent install of the EMS with a remote display. Both major brands are good, I chose the one I bought on price and availability.

Batt cable sizes are important and I would consider buss bars if I was doing it again. Keep your connections to a low number, for example I did not mount a fuse holder, I just put the fuse on the batt post, thereby eliminating one cable and a connection. I also learned that 4 awg is not 0000 or 4/0 wire. 4/0 welding cable is fairly expensive and you need to have calculated your batt cables length and sizes very closely in order to save space, weight, and money. Welding cables might increase efficiencies. There is little price difference and the welding cable is more durable. I could have saved a few bucks here and there and it added up in the end. To measure out my cables I used an old garden hose and I cut them to length as I simulated the routing, in this manner I came up with accurate lengths. DC breakers may serve better than fuses, because they can be used as switches, saving more connections. However you should never blow a battery fuse as large as the one you will be installing. If you do then something bad happened.

Take what I say with a grain of salt, but i just got finished installing mine and I had a great time doing it, my qualifications are a little understanding of electricity, AC and DC, being a good wrench, a passion for reading directions, and having good outcomes. Look at my photos and you can see why a solar installer complimented me on it, he quizzed me pretty hard on my install, I guess I passed. But I don't really deserve any compliments because there are much better installs that can be seen on YouTube videos or extensive articles on the net that helped me along.

One of the main things I discovered is that 6v golf cart battery series/parallel to form 12v and X amp hours, is not the only way to go. Real lead acid industrial RE (renewable energy) batteries are available in 12v. I have 300 AH on 2 12v batts. You have to have 4 6v batts to exceed that. But then I can exceed the 4 6v with 3 12v. Unless I have overlooked something, I think that 12v industrial RE batteries are the way to go, less batts = less chance of failure, less connections, less battery cables, and I think 6v batts should be going by way of the fin soon. I have asked on several blogs why six's instead of twelves, and no-one has ever offered me a reason. I wish someone would. I hope I have not overlooked some physical property of a six volt battery.

Sorry to ramble on but I'm reliving the past year of doing exactly what you are doing. I'm living vicariously through your project. So now let the fun begin, you are about to learn a lot from all the debate that will take place over my thorough explanation, to your simple question. But I think I have it generally right. Once you get to this level the solar is easy. You can look at my list of items to get an idea what might work for you. I highly recommend the panels I used, I don't think you can beat them.


Ok, so shore power is run through the generator and bonded there. Then through the inverter and bonded there.

scottyb
06-25-2014, 03:03 PM
Jeff, what factors made you go with the Hybrid? Also I can see why you went with the 6-CT instead of the 4-CT. Same footprint, lower cost / Ah. However, it looks to be a 3x the cost / Ah of Sam's or Costco GC-2's. I'm certainly not arguing the difference in quality and the convenience of AGM's. Just wondering what drove your decision.

scottyb
06-25-2014, 03:25 PM
Jim, that's a great description. If you mentioned which inverter you installed, I must have missed it as well as the photos.

Ladiver
06-25-2014, 03:43 PM
Jeff, what factors made you go with the Hybrid? Also I can see why you went with the 6-CT instead of the 4-CT. Same footprint, lower cost / Ah. However, it looks to be a 3x the cost / Ah of Sam's or Costco GC-2's. I'm certainly not arguing the difference in quality and the convenience of AGM's. Just wondering what drove your decision.
I decided on the hybrid after talking to Magnum and a few installers. I liked the features of supplementing power as needed. plus I found a hybrid for less than the 2812! As for the batteries, I know I overpaid, but there are many things in life where you get what you pay for. Will this be one? I don't know, but the shop highly recommended them and they have been honest and fair in the past. They have always done what was right, not necessarily the cheapest. After $3k+, a few hundred bucks extra for a high quality battery seems fair. Plus the charge rate on the batteries combined with the variable charge settings of the inverter should allow for a much quicker recharge. I spoke with someone from Lifeline who put a Magnum setup in his SOB trailer. he also recommended the hybrid with advanced remote.
If it all works, I will be thrilled. If not, I will sell it to the next guy.

Sent from my HTCONE using Tapatalk

Jim.Allison
06-25-2014, 06:12 PM
Xantrex Freedom SW3012, I really had a good time doing it. I was reluctant at first but once I got started it all fell into place. BTW I edited it a couple of times so you probably did not miss anything in your first read.
Jim, that's a great description. If you mentioned which inverter you installed, I must have missed it as well as the photos.

Jim.Allison
06-25-2014, 06:26 PM
http://magnumenergy.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/64-0058-Rev-A-MSH-M-Series_Web.pdf

This is the magnum hybrid, it looks like my exact installation. I would get the shunt from Bogart so that you get the right one for their trimetric. You will eventually want the trimetric.

Ladiver
06-25-2014, 07:34 PM
Jim,

What makes the Tri-Metic better than the Magnum? I figure that keeping like components normally works better when you look at the entire system.

Jeff

porthole
06-26-2014, 08:27 AM
Jeff, might be too late if your installer doesn't know.

If you are using the Progressive EMS it must be installed before the inverted power.
Installing the EMS after the inverter WILL cause the EMS control board to fail.

If you have a transfer switch I would install the EMS between the transfer switch and the inverter. If you are using an EMS it may as well protect you from the genny as well. Although your genset is no doubt wired correctly, you can still lose neutral or ground from the genny up to and through the transfer switch.

At the recent National Rally one of our members who did not have an EMS had the neutral wire fail on the output side of his transfer switch. He was lucky in the only damaged items were a microwave and portable ice maker.

porthole
06-26-2014, 08:32 AM
Jim,

What makes the Tri-Metic better than the Magnum? I figure that keeping like components normally works better when you look at the entire system.

Jeff

It isn't better, just different (and less expensive).

The Tri-metric controllers came about before the sophisticated controllers that are now available from the inverter manufacturers.
When only simple on/off and battery voltage monitors were available with inverters, the Tri-metric offered features not available from the OEM's at the time.

The controller you are getting, matched to your inverter is the best value. It should do everything you can think of as well as a few features you probably never thought of. I'm guessing if your installer spec'd it out for you, that he also included the Magnum battery monitor, which is basically a large shunt (400+ amps) and the networking required to allow it to communicate with the controller.

Don't forget to take pictures and post!