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Blue Oval
08-27-2014, 10:16 PM
We bought our RW 310 for the convenience it would give us when dry camping. As a firefighter I am well aware of the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning. I thought one of the advantages of having the generator would be that you could sleep at night with A/C. The manuals stated numerous times to not use the generator when sleeping. I want to be safe, but don't want to be sweating all night when I'm trying to sleep. Does anyone else run their generator when sleeping? I would keep several windows own and a fan running to keep the air circulating.

jnbhobe
08-27-2014, 10:21 PM
I run mine at night when I have to but its very quiet ( Honda ) I know some that use a Gen-Turi that takes the exhaust up over the roof

Jim.Allison
08-28-2014, 12:12 AM
The Onan 5500 LP burnes .8 gallons per hour. It would be dangerous if for some reason it entered your rig while sleeping, but this is a game of math. How much CO can enter your rig when your generator is properly exhausted? Your pipe would almost have to be blowing into your rig. Its hard to get much CO from burning .8 gallons per hour, most of that is drifting away in the atmosphere.

That does not sound like much, but CO is not a normal gas. It accumulates in the body over time until you die. It takes longer for the body to remove CO than it does to take it in, this is what makes it so poisonous.

Your alarm should alert you to CO through, So I guess if you wanted to protect yourself from the unlikely but deadly event of being poisoned, by your generator burning .8 gallons per hour, you could add a second CO detector.

People used to sleep with butane or propane heaters burning in their houses. But they had catalyst brick in the stove. There were no CO detectors back then either. But, you would hear from time to time that a family passed away sleeping because of a faulty heater. Then there is your furnace, do you mind sleeping with your furnace on? I dont know the answers to your questions. But this is what I think about when trying to justify doing something that Onan is telling me not to do.

I have not decided what I'm going to do. But this is a good case for having a generator that you can set up away from your rig.


We bought our RW 310 for the convenience it would give us when dry camping. As a firefighter I am well aware of the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning. I thought one of the advantages of having the generator would be that you could sleep at night with A/C. The manuals stated numerous times to not use the generator when sleeping. I want to be safe, but don't want to be sweating all night when I'm trying to sleep. Does anyone else run their generator when sleeping? I would keep several windows own and a fan running to keep the air circulating.

TandT
08-28-2014, 12:41 AM
JMHO, If you plan to run your onboard Onan genny for extended periods, look into getting a Genturi. It will carry the majority of exhaust vapors up and away from the rig.
I made a similar device for around $25 and it works well. There are videos on Youtube showing you how to make one.
Trace

danemayer
08-28-2014, 05:16 AM
The manuals stated numerous times to not use the generator when sleeping.

Here's what my Onan manual says:


Never sleep in the vehicle with the genset running unless the vehicle is equipped with a working carbon
monoxide detector. Primary protection against inhaling carbon monoxide, however, is proper
installation of the exhaust system, daily (every eight hour) inspection for visible and audible exhaust
system leaks.

Do you have a working carbon monoxide detector? Is the exhaust system installed correctly and checked periodically for leaks? I would think checking it after travel would be most important since damage to the exhaust system would most likely happen while towing.

NWILSON
08-28-2014, 06:01 AM
Since CO is an odorless and tasteless gas your only protection while awake is noticing the onset of poisoning symptoms. Since many of us would think little of being a little lightheaded or sleepy during the day our only real protection is the CO detector! Proper maintenance and replacement of all detectors in the rig is paramount. Using a Genturi is an excellent defense. We've had one for 2 yrs and have never heard a peep from the CO detector or even smelled exhaust in the rig. Placement of a second CO detector along with regular exhaust system inspections, as Dan stated, should be as much protection as you could get.

jnbhobe
08-28-2014, 06:10 AM
The Onan 5500 LP burnes .8 gallons per hour. It would be dangerous if for some reason it entered your rig while sleeping, but this is a game of math. How much CO can enter your rig when your generator is properly exhausted? Your pipe would almost have to be blowing into your rig. Its hard to get much CO from burning .8 gallons per hour, most of that is drifting away in the atmosphere.

That does not sound like much, but CO is not a normal gas. It accumulates in the body over time until you die. It takes longer for the body to remove CO than it does to take it in, this is what makes it so poisonous.

Your alarm should alert you to CO through, So I guess if you wanted to protect yourself from the unlikely but deadly event of being poisoned, by your generator burning .8 gallons per hour, you could add a second CO detector.

People used to sleep with butane or propane heaters burning in their houses. But they had catalyst brick in the stove. There were no CO detectors back then either. But, you would hear from time to time that a family passed away sleeping because of a faulty heater. Then there is your furnace, do you mind sleeping with your furnace on? I dont know the answers to your questions. But this is what I think about when trying to justify doing something that Onan is telling me not to do.

I have not decided what I'm going to do. But this is a good case for having a generator that you can set up away from your rig.

Since this a Road Warrior we are talking about a gas powered generator.

szewczyk_john
08-28-2014, 06:11 AM
I go to to many NASCAR races and do boon docking for any where between 3 and 6 days at each race. We have done New Hampshire for 9 days for years was well. I have used my gas powered generator without any issue. My exhaust comes out between the bedroom slide and underbelly door. I made my own stack to take the exhaust up over the roof line but I did not do this until the second year of ownership. They are really simple to make, the key is leave 3 inches or so of space between the tip of the exhaust pipe and the start of the stack. I used a 90 degree piece of conduit that slides over the exhaust pipe and goes in place of the chrome exhaust tip. I took stainless steel 3/4 inch wide 1/8 inch think stock and made 3 brackets to go from the conduit to three inch PVC pipe.

Bohemian
08-28-2014, 07:18 AM
My Onan generator documents say that extensions to the exhaust are NOT to be used.

Independently, the increased exhaust length will increase back pressure and increase the chance of a leak back stream of the exhaust pipe in or under the RV

Also, CO disperses in the air quickly and reacts with O2 to create O3 very quickly. CO only presents a significant danger when trapped in an enclosed space.

Make sure your exhaust pipe is attached correctly and pointed to exhaust beyond the sidewall of the RV.

Some 5th wheel applications exhaust directly out the bottom of the generator. This provides an example of how fast CO disperses and reacts.

hoefler
08-28-2014, 07:52 AM
When I installed my generator, Onan 4K, I plumbed the exhaust all the way to the rear of the coach and exited below the ladder. The pipe I used is 1 1/2", the generator has 1"exhuast from the motor, and use a Venturie on it. Have run it for hours with out issue.

porthole
08-28-2014, 10:30 AM
OP - since you are a FF, you probably know the real reason that CO is so deadly and it is not the reason mentioned above.

That said, every heartland factory installed genny has exhaust exiting from under the left side (there are a few SOB toy haulers that exited the right side).

Most of the HL's exit between the slides. I'm pretty sure your 310 is the same as our Cyclone 3010, exiting between the slides but under a basement door. Was never crazy about that.

There is a reason building codes require all "flame" devices exhaust a minimun of 5' from any opening or window in a buiding.

The factory installs "use" to come with a chrome tailpipe extension that pushed the exit out past the sidewall of the trailer.

- I have to switch to my iPad, I'll finish in a bit -

We are on our 6th season and only twice did the CO detector alert. Both times was after 8 or more hours of use and both times overnight. One occasion I attributed to our being parked next to a steep slope. The front of the trialer was very low to the ground and the left side had a hill the was well above the roof of our rig.

The second time was during a 100 degree stint at Dover speedway with zero breeze.

I have since added a Genturi pipe extension to put the draft above the roof line. FYI, with Genturi you will most likely need the 18" extension to clear our roofs.

Two notes, Bohemian mentioned extensions are not to be used. The manual is referring to extending your tailpipe with hard pipe. The Genturi has an air gap between it and the genny exhaust. This just pulls a draft and redirects the exahust up over the roof.

I do use an 18" extension on occasion to just assure the exahust is clear of the rig.

Hoefler mentioned plumbing all the way to the rear of the trailer.
I have considered this a few times. If you search online you can find a calculator to determine what size pipe is needed based on the length of run and number of turns (90's).
Onan, although diffulcult to find, does list the exhaust requirements as far as piping and back pressure requirements are.

You are right to be concerned, regardless of burning .8 GPH on propane or .6 gph on gasoline, both scenarios produce CO.

Open windows (obviously away from the exhaust) are your best bet along with a properly operating CO detector. Besides the factory installed hard wired 12 volt detetor I alos have a battery powered hosehold type.

And of course, if really concerned, just don't do it.

TandT
08-28-2014, 10:35 AM
My Onan generator documents say that extensions to the exhaust are NOT to be used.



The Genturi design is not an exhaust extension per se, where the genny has to push all the way to the end.
It actually pulls the exhaust pressure out of the tailpipe causing no more back pressure than the stock tailpipe. Trace

Bohemian
08-28-2014, 10:51 AM
Really, how does it "pull"? Does it have a fan?

porthole
08-28-2014, 11:14 AM
Using the heat of the exhaust, it creates an updraft in the pipe, which in turn pulls air from around the venturi at the bottom as well as the exhaust.

The test for the Gen-turi once installed is to place a small piece of paper at the venturi and have it pushed up and out the top of the pipe.

Duane
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Jim.Allison
08-28-2014, 11:53 AM
Carbon monoxide poisoning (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide_poisoning) is the most common type of fatal air poisoning in many countries.[23] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide#cite_note-Toxicology2002-omaye-23) Carbon monoxide is colorless, odorless, and tasteless, but highly toxic. It combines with hemoglobin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemoglobin) to produce carboxyhemoglobin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carboxyhemoglobin), which usurps the space in hemoglobin that normally carries oxygen, but is ineffective for delivering oxygen to bodily tissues. Concentrations as low as 667 ppm (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parts_per_notation) may cause up to 50% of the body's hemoglobin to convert to carboxyhemoglobin.[24] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide#cite_note-24) A level of 50% carboxyhemoglobin may result in seizure, coma, and fatality. In the United States, the OSHA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occupational_Safety_and_Health_Administration) limits long-term workplace exposure levels above 50 ppm.[25] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide#cite_note-25) Within short time scales, carbon monoxide absorption is cumulative, since the half-life is about 5 hours in fresh air.

szewczyk_john
08-28-2014, 12:05 PM
I have never used the paper test with my system. I can tell you that when you put your hand new the air gap you will feel the breeze of air being sucked up the stack. It works that well. At most NASCAR events you get parked close to your neighbors. with slide outs on both sides of the newer trailers you are really close to each other. I would be blowing my exhaust right under the next trailers canopy or even their slide out.

New Hampshire Speedway has 18 foot wide Rv lots. That 18 feet is for RV, slide outs and canopy. You can pay more for 20 foot wide spots. One year I had a neighbor that had an issue with slide out mechanism and in order for us to work on it, I had to close my slide outs since there was not enough room to walk between the slides.

szewczyk_john
08-28-2014, 12:11 PM
This would be another good question to ask the Onan representative at the next National Rally when they come for a seminar, right Duane? One of us need to remember about this thread!

Bohemian
08-28-2014, 12:23 PM
Using the heat of the exhaust, it creates an updraft in the pipe, which in turn pulls air from around the venturi at the bottom as well as the exhaust.

The test for the Gen-turi once installed is to place a small piece of paper at the venturi and have it pushed up and out the top of the pipe.

Duane
Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

I see.

It has a great big leak at the bottom that prevents backpressure.

Then, it has the potential of moving the exhaust gasses up over the roof by the chimney effect.

Yet, I visited the CAMCO Manufacturing web site and they present no independent laboratory testing to certify that it either works or is safe. The also have not had it certified by any generator manufacturer, as required by the generator manufactures, to be approved for use on their generator.

I grant you, it looks as if this one probably does no harm, and could possibly do a little good. Of course, we really know nothing without independent testing.

Bohemian
08-28-2014, 12:25 PM
Yep. Really nasty stuff. That is why this is such a serious issue.

porthole
08-28-2014, 01:07 PM
John, is NH camping on the property like Dover?

We have been fortunate at Dover for 3 years now, no trailers in front or to the sides for 3-4 spaces, which are all about 20x40

szewczyk_john
08-29-2014, 04:57 AM
yep on property behind the track. They have like 7 different lots. some have family hours with quiet times of 10:00- 6, others at 11-6, and lot x is the party zone with no quiet hours. Years ago they enforced the rules but they have slacked off a lot. When you get there you to your assigned lot and are parked according to the length of your unit. I always used the F lot and got there by Monday so we ended up closer to the track. After buying our current unit the wife talked me into the oversize parking in lot 5. You would not believe how much a difference those extra feet make. The bad think about NHIS is the lots are pretty flat but the drainage sucks. If the have yet weather you can get stuck in a low point you will have water for a longer time. If you ever get there and your early and the try to park you in a low spot tell them that you are waiting for a buddy or that you do not want to be in the low point. They will allow you to let the area fill up and then get back into line. The have honey suckers, ice and water trucks driving thru the lots all week. But there is water on the property (in at least 2 locations that I know of) and free showers. They do get packed at certain times. Take your bike, some beautiful country up there. We used the track as our base camp and took day trips to the White Mountains, Laconia Lake Area(bike week is the week before the July race), Rye Beach and there is so much more. Any where north of the track on 93 and you get into some really nice mountains, streams and lakes.

Bohemian
08-29-2014, 06:57 AM
Here's the rub on the Gen-Turi

If the vertical pipe actually has a draft great enough to move all the exhaust gas without causing back pressure, then the leak at the bottom is totally unnecessary.

whp4262
08-29-2014, 06:58 AM
Mount another CO detector in the bedroom and get a Genturi exhaust. The Genturi works pretty well. Only time I've noticed exhaust was with a wind from the the exhaust side of the trailer that was blowing it back under the rig. The Genturi fixes that problem.


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TravisJen
08-29-2014, 07:22 AM
We camp with a couple that has a Fuzion 399 and they've had their CO detector go off almost every night that they've run their Onan 5500. I'm not sure if the exhaust isn't properly routed or what but I wouldn't want to chance it.
Quick side question: Our CO detector is mounted on the ceiling above the kitchen island (literally the highest point in the trailer). Is this the correct place to have it? I was under the impression that CO was heavier than air so therefore the detector should be closer to the floor?

Seren
08-29-2014, 08:19 AM
We have a "bird in a cage", if the bird dies then it is time to turn off the generator. We usually have to buy 2-3 birds each year. Seriously, millions of Koreans, Japanese and Chinese burn kerosene heaters in their homes during the winter, they just make sure they open a couple of windows about a inch when using them. We open our kitchen window slightly when we cook on the stove since burning propane obviously creates CO.


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Seren
08-29-2014, 08:24 AM
Quick side question: Our CO detector is mounted on the ceiling above the kitchen island (literally the highest point in the trailer). Is this the correct place to have it? I was under the impression that CO was heavier than air so therefore the detector should be closer to the floor?

I am pretty sure that is the smoke detector since we have one in the kitchen/hallway area in our Landmark. Our CO detector is next to the theater seating near the bottom of the slide wall. At night with the lights off you can see a green LED light on it indicating it is on and working.


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jbeletti
08-29-2014, 08:32 AM
Duane and other FFs can put a finer point on this based on their training and experience, but here's a link (http://www.homesafe.com/coalert/detect.htm) to a resource with some good CO tips.

It seems that CO has a specific gravity nearly the same as air, so high placement versus low placement doesn't seem to be a huge factor. But proximity to high humidity areas and cooking appliances seems to be a no-no.

If I ran a genny while we were sleeping, I'd add an additional CO detector on the front closet wall. We'd surely here it there and it's closer to any area the genny exhaust may creep into the bedroom.

jbeletti
08-29-2014, 08:38 AM
This would be another good question to ask the Onan representative at the next National Rally when they come for a seminar, right Duane? One of us need to remember about this thread!

This is on my list to see if I can get Onan to present a seminar.

szewczyk_john
08-29-2014, 09:03 AM
I know that it is on your list to get a rep there, and now Duane and I are starting a list of things to ask. As I stated before. it was not until I walked around at the Urbanna rally did I realize that so many of the bigger Heartland fivers not have the generator. I just assumed that most purchased that option. I saw so many members using that front area for the additional storage. But I think that an Onan rep will get a lot of attention and questions from those of us that have a generator in our unit.

jbeletti
08-29-2014, 09:18 AM
John,

Yes, it's a very small percentage of non-toyhauler 5th wheels that get ordered with the generator.

Sometime in May, I'd like to get your and Duane's list of questions for Onan as I'd like to get the list to them in advance so they can come prepared with answers. That will make for a more effective session :)

porthole
08-29-2014, 10:47 AM
Here's the rub on the Gen-Turi

If the vertical pipe actually has a draft great enough to move all the exhaust gas without causing back pressure, then the leak at the bottom is totally unnecessary.

It is more then just that. The air entrained into the stream cools the exhaust to keep the PVC pipe cool.

The genny exhaust straight into a PVC pipe would melt the pipe

Bohemian
08-29-2014, 11:32 AM
Gen-Turi


Yes, PVC would need to be cooled.

Cooling will reduce the heat in the pipe and reduce the chimney effect and efficiency. Make the system NOT move the gasses up the pipe as effectively as if it was heated. That is increase the back pressure and make the leak more necessary.

Heat proof pipe, metal or ceramic, of the same inner diameter would be more effective, have less back pressure, and not require the leak if effective enough. Plastic pipe will be less effective, and obviously require the huge leak.

Jim.Allison
08-29-2014, 11:41 AM
Both Heartland and Onan warn against sleeping with the generator running in their owners manual. I don't believe that you will get anyones stamp of approval on that issue.

The beauty of the genturi design is that the openings at the bottom allow for a draft that that is developed hot gasses as well as combine the exhaust with atmospheric air, ultimately the exhaust is diluted by the time it exits the genturi pipe. A common fireplace develops a draft because of of the heat and exhaust being allowed to migrate up the chimney but every one knows that a fireplace will not draft when a house is sealed up. The velocity of the draft allowed by the inclusion of the atmosphere, is what relieves the back pressure from the longer pipe.

As far as density of gas is concerned CO is slightly less dense than the atmosphere at the same temperature and pressure, But since it is warmer than the surrounding air it tends to rise where is safely dispersed in the atmosphere.

Once again, its a math game, the troublesome poisonous gas is accumulative in the human body, it is retained by the body and accumulates there, it takes 5 hours for CO to exit the body in fresh air. Meaning I find you dazed by CO it will take 5 hours breathing fresh air to get the last molecule you breathed in, to exit your body. All the time that CO is globbed on to your blood cells those blood cells cannot process O2. This is why it is so dangerous.

Bohemian
08-29-2014, 12:08 PM
Gen-Turi


Still, no independent anybody who says it actually either works or is safe. Many reasons to doubt. Gen manufacturers do not support use. Many ways to spend money on these kind of things.

Potential CO poisoning hazard. Though, I think this one has enough leaks that it is probably safe

NWILSON
08-29-2014, 01:03 PM
Gen-Turi


Still, no independent anybody who says it actually either works or is safe. Many reasons to doubt. Gen manufacturers do not support use. Many ways to spend money on these kind of things.

Potential CO poisoning hazard. Though, I think this one has enough leaks that it is probably safe
Since the Genturi is marketed by Camco, arguably the largest aftermarket RV supplier, I'm sure they (and their lawyers) have a huge amount of confidence in the functionality of their product.
Simple physics explains how it works and I have a whole lot of confidence in physics.

porthole
08-29-2014, 03:23 PM
Gen-Turi


Still, no independent anybody who says it actually either works or is safe. Many reasons to doubt. Gen manufacturers do not support use. Many ways to spend money on these kind of things.

Potential CO poisoning hazard. Though, I think this one has enough leaks that it is probably safe

Well I suppose you have made your point. You are convinced it is all smoke and mirrors and there are few here that are convinced it is an effective tool for the RV lifestyle.

And that is why we have chocolate and vanilla - choices.

Although - vanilla is a better choice.

whp4262
08-29-2014, 05:37 PM
Well I suppose you have made your point. You are convinced it is all smoke and mirrors and there are few here that are convinced it is an effective tool for the RV lifestyle.

And that is why we have chocolate and vanilla - choices.

Although - vanilla is a better choice.

I disagree, chocolate is much better then vanilla.


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Jim.Allison
08-29-2014, 06:52 PM
It is obvious that the Gen-Turi principle is sound. How well it works is another question, I don't own one. But I cannot see why it would not work for its intended purpose. If the guy that came up with that idea worked for me, I would say "cool lets see if it works."

But what is important is that everyone agrees that CO is dangerous and steps must be taken to protect yourself from it. That is important.

As a young man I became a pilot, back then you had to study every little thing from the beginning of aviation. Small private airplanes use the exhaust pipe for cabin heat. The system would sometimes fail and allow small amounts of CO into the cockpit. Planes crashed because of it. I fear the CO because it takes so little of it to get you, an you can never tell where it comes from. Its not the exhaust that comes out of the end of the pipe that I worried about, it is the exhaust that comes from manifold leaks and the like. Then again we have CO detectors that are virtually perfect and 100% reliable, I would think that a second CO detector cold make it failsafe. The odds of two failing have to be astronomical.

Right now I'm neutral on the issue, but I cannot say that I would sleep in my rig with the generator running without thinking real hard about it.

szewczyk_john
08-29-2014, 11:18 PM
Well since we have basically agreed to disagree allow me to state that when you show up at a race or any other place where your unit is in tight spaces you will welcome the neighbor that breaks out one of these devices or you will be forced to go inside your unit and close the doors and windows on the door side when your neighbor decides to run their generator. It doesn't matter if it is overnight or during the day.

There are two things that everyone at the race track hates to see. A loud lawn mower sounding generator and/or a neighbor not exhausting generator exhaust over the roof line.

Jim.Allison
08-29-2014, 11:37 PM
Ditto, when boondocking being a good neighbor is crucial.

Boostable
08-30-2014, 05:49 AM
Sitting in a parking lot with about 100 other RV's for the opening of college football today. Everyone is required to run a smoke stack here and everyone is. I will do a head count to make sure everyone is ok, but I'm pretty sure these things work as advertised.. :D

hoefler
08-30-2014, 07:28 AM
Another thing to consider when using the Genturi, the stack draws in air and dilutes the exhaust and gets that exhaust above the roof line where there usually is a breeze to disperse it.

porthole
08-30-2014, 08:01 AM
That would be a good place for the NFPA, IFGC, UL, CR, BOCA, RVIA etc types to show up and a test. A couple of PHD's as well.

Bohemian
08-30-2014, 08:56 AM
It is obvious that the Gen-Turi principle is sound. How well it works is another question, I don't own one. But I cannot see why it would not work for its intended purpose. If the guy that came up with that idea worked for me, I would say "cool lets see if it works."

But what is important is that everyone agrees that CO is dangerous and steps must be taken to protect yourself from it. That is important.

As a young man I became a pilot, back then you had to study every little thing from the beginning of aviation. Small private airplanes use the exhaust pipe for cabin heat. The system would sometimes fail and allow small amounts of CO into the cockpit. Planes crashed because of it. I fear the CO because it takes so little of it to get you, an you can never tell where it comes from. Its not the exhaust that comes out of the end of the pipe that I worried about, it is the exhaust that comes from manifold leaks and the like. Then again we have CO detectors that are virtually perfect and 100% reliable, I would think that a second CO detector cold make it failsafe. The odds of two failing have to be astronomical.

Right now I'm neutral on the issue, but I cannot say that I would sleep in my rig with the generator running without thinking real hard about it.

Not at all. Just more unsupported rhetoric to end discussion. BTW you have a PhD in physical science posting here, me. Also an MBA. o I know what I am talking about in the physics world, the engineering world, and the business world. I know ho much untested ideas can and most often screw up. I don't think a company like CAMCO Manufacturing has the capability to design, engineer, test and certify a proper exhaust system. If they did it WOULD be certified by a already existing proper agency.

Still your are right. It might work. Positive accidents do occasionally happen, and so do the bad accidents occasionally. Especially with off the cuff designs that the manufacturer decided to not have certified by the proper already existing agencies of which they should already be well aware.

porthole
08-30-2014, 10:26 AM
Some really really really smart people designed the things that take us into space. But, they have not been infallible in designing and "engineering" things I can't even comprehend. 17 sets of acronyms after a name still does not make any guarantees.

Although there is no testing to prove whether a Gen-Turi works or not - one is certain - Corvairs and Volkswagens were tested by experts - and they still leaked exhaust into the passenger compartments.
I'll skip the "engineering" that went into the original Corvair suspension .......

danemayer
08-30-2014, 10:57 AM
Seems like a lot of debating about things unknown.

Maybe one of you guys could contact the manufacturer and/or original designers of the device and ask them what testing or certification has been done. Then report back.

TandT
08-30-2014, 12:05 PM
As I said earlier, I have used the Gen Turi style stack that I made without any problems. I feel it is a vast improvement over allowing the exhaust to vent under the rig.
With that said, I spend most of my time in some of the warmest climates is the country. Many times in summer, it barely goes under 85 degrees at night.( If I know in advance that it will be very warm, I usually won't boondock if I have a choice.)
Yet, I do not run the generator at night. I'm not saying I wouldn't in a dire situation, I just don't recall ever having done it.
If we are boondocking and it's warm at night we run the AC before bed to cool it down, then shut down the A/C and generator. Then we open the windows and turn on a couple of 12v fans along with the Fantastics. It usually is fine for sleeping.
So, what I'm wondering is, for most folks, why would it be necessary to run the generator while sleeping?
If you have something other than A/C, such as a CPAP that requires AC power, I would use an inverter. Much cleaner and quieter IMHO. Trace

Boostable
08-30-2014, 07:06 PM
Running the gen at night? Simple answer for me.. August in Florida, 96+ and heat index above 105, humidity about 85%... Ooo and most importantly four daughters and a wife.. Windows open and fan blowing isn't gonna cut it.

TandT
08-30-2014, 07:12 PM
Running the gen at night? Simple answer for me.. August in Florida, 96+ and heat index above 105, humidity about 85%... Ooo and most importantly four daughters and a wife.. Windows open and fan blowing isn't gonna cut it.
I've tent camped in conditions about like that. Your right, the humidity makes it a bit of a struggle.
I would suggest that you need to be in a campground with power for the comfort of your family at that time of year.
In the dead of summer when I know the temps are that warm, I normally don't hit the road [planning] to dry camp. Sometimes it is necessary for a stopover or overflow camping.
I have found boondocking (by choice) in warmer climates is normally an October thru April activity. Travel safe. Trace

Jim.Allison
08-31-2014, 03:49 AM
Not at all. Just more unsupported rhetoric to end discussion. BTW you have a PhD in physical science posting here, me. Also an MBA. o I know what I am talking about in the physics world, the engineering world, and the business world.

Im curious; are you bragging or complaining? Quit stalking me from one thread to another. I will not be bullied by you.

As far as education is concerned...........ROFLMAO........Bragging about your education is a way to give yourself credibility when your knowledge does not precede you.

szewczyk_john
08-31-2014, 04:49 AM
2014 first week of April - Martinsville VA each night it got down into the 20 degree range. Ran generator for the warmth and to protect the water lines from freezing up. I was very concerned about having bursting lines but a few trouble lights placed properly and a space heater prevented that from happening. I do run 2 6 volt batteries but as cold as it got, I was worried that the furnace running all night would kill batteries.

One last word to Bohemian - A whole bunch of book smart people claim that the tow master tire is a well engineered road worthy tire. However, a bunch of mechanically inclined, street smart owners know better and have taken these P.O.S. tires off of our rigs. to each their own, but I'll stick with the street smarts that have served me well so far.

caissiel
08-31-2014, 07:11 AM
Agree.
The genturi does work. But I will never sleep with the power plant running.

Boostable
08-31-2014, 08:06 AM
I've tent camped in conditions about like that. Your right, the humidity makes it a bit of a struggle.
I would suggest that you need to be in a campground with power for the comfort of your family at that time of year.
In the dead of summer when I know the temps are that warm, I normally don't hit the road [planning] to dry camp. Sometimes it is necessary for a stopover or overflow camping.
I have found boondocking (by choice) in warmer climates is normally an October thru April activity. Travel safe. Trace


Agree 100% and try to go full hookup when it's hot. However this weekend is a good example of when we don't have a choice. Staying on the university campus they only offer the spot, but no hookups. Being close is great!!! Having to run the gen all weekend, not so much. On another note, glad I put fuel in the aux tank or we would of never made it!

Blue Oval
08-31-2014, 04:06 PM
Were you at the gator game?



I've tent camped in conditions about like that. Your right, the humidity makes it a bit of a struggle.
I would suggest that you need to be in a campground with power for the comfort of your family at that time of year.
In the dead of summer when I know the temps are that warm, I normally don't hit the road [planning] to dry camp. Sometimes it is necessary for a stopover or overflow camping.
I have found boondocking (by choice) in warmer climates is normally an October thru April activity. Travel safe. Trace


Agree 100% and try to go full hookup when it's hot. However this weekend is a good example of when we don't have a choice. Staying on the university campus they only offer the spot, but no hookups. Being close is great!!! Having to run the gen all weekend, not so much. On another note, glad I put fuel in the aux tank or we would of never made it!

Bohemian
08-31-2014, 07:12 PM
RV Generator Exhaust Extension Kits (http://www.funroads.com/rv-repair/generators/exhaustextensions/)

Cummins Onan Statement Regarding Exhaust Extensions

RV Generator Exhaust Extension Kits do not meet reasonable standards for safely

Cummins Power Generation, manufacturer of Cummins Onan generator products, does not endorse the use of RV generator exhaust pipe extensions. Like all fuel burning devices, engine-driven generators emit carbon monoxide (CO) which, if not safely handled, can produce serious injury or death. Cummins Onan generators, in conjunction with RV OEM installed tailpipes, are designed to meet RVIA standards for safely handling exhaust gasses while minimizing noise and maximizing generator performance. Improper modifications to the exhaust components can result in unreasonable hazards to the vehicle occupants.
Cummins Power Generation has been unable to this date to identify any commercially available exhaust extension kit which meets reasonable standards for safely handling exhaust gases.
Cummins Power Generationís concerns revolve around 6 areas:


Weight: Unless entirely self supporting, extensions add weight to the end of the generator tail pipe which can stress and crack or break the exhaust system parts that are not designed to carry the additional weight. This could result in exhaust gases escaping directly under the coach, and therefore could be extremely
dangerous to vehicle occupants.
Fit: To be effective conveyors of exhaust, connections & joints must be gas-tight. Such connections are not guaranteed unless the exhaust extension kit is properly assembled each time it is used.
Exhaust Direction: Because exhaust extensions vent at the roof line, there is a major concern that exhaust will be sucked in by rooftop air conditioners, vents and windows.
Heat: Many extension designs involve exposed metal that can be a burn hazard to anyone passing by who might contact the exposed extension pipe.
Back pressure: Adding an extension may increase back pressure on the engine, and thereby reduce engine performance or cause the engine to fail meeting government-regulated exhaust standards.
Warranty: The use of an exhaust extension kit may void the Cummins Onan warranty.

(http://www.funroads.com/rv-repair/generators/exhaustextensions/)

http://www.funroads.com/rv-repair/generators/exhaustextensions/

Boostable
08-31-2014, 07:36 PM
Were you at the gator game?

Yes sir... In all its non glory!!! Hopefully next week will be more kind. You?

Blue Oval
09-04-2014, 09:28 PM
Were you at the gator game?

Yes sir... In all its non glory!!! Hopefully next week will be more kind. You?

At least your getting your money for the ticket back.

Blue Oval
09-04-2014, 09:46 PM
Gonna try and make the Kentucky game. Depends on my work schedule. :(

porthole
09-14-2014, 07:42 AM
I got to speak at length with someone far more familiar with both the genny's in question and the Gen-Turi and with sufficient initials after has name and plenty of experience.

As far as the "Gen-Turi" brand "up-lifter" goes - I will continue to use it and feel comfortable in using it, it does what it is designed to do.
All the boilerplate above is legalese.

Jim.Allison
09-14-2014, 12:29 PM
Ditto: in today's litigious society no-one is going to publish anything concerning someone elses product and carbon monoxide. And its only natural for Cummins to cover themselves.

Bohemian
09-18-2014, 07:33 AM
Ditto: in today's litigious society no-one is going to publish anything concerning someone elses product and carbon monoxide. And its only natural for Cummins to cover themselves.

Really?? I wonder what all those certification agencies are doing now that they do nothing.

https://www.google.com/search?q=who+certifiies+heating+syustems&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:IE-Address&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&sourceid=ie7&rlz=1I7SKPT_enUS432&gws_rd=ssl#rls=com.microsoft:en-US:IE-Address&q=product+certifications

Jim.Allison
09-20-2014, 11:34 PM
Dont drink and blog!!!!! LOL You might take issue with something that you know absolutely nothing about. You might even start claiming that you're a professor of engineering and you have a PHD in physics. It could happen. LOL.

There is no doubt in my mind that the Gen-turi works as advertised.

Bohemian
09-21-2014, 09:10 AM
And yet my only point, no actual technical evidence from the manufacture no supporting certifications. I have made no statement as to its works or not as we have no technical data on which to make a judgment. That is the nature of science and engineering evidence. We have only sale pitches.


Dont drink and blog!!!!! LOL You might take issue with something that you know absolutely nothing about. You might even start claiming that you're a professor of engineering and you have a PHD in physics. It could happen. LOL.

There is no doubt in my mind that the Gen-turi works as advertised.

porthole
09-23-2014, 07:21 AM
And yet my only point, no actual technical evidence from the manufacture no supporting certifications. I have made no statement as to its works or not as we have no technical data on which to make a judgment. That is the nature of science and engineering evidence. We have only sale pitches.


Which genset is in your rig?