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View Full Version : Chloroplast under frame (sp)



Bones
05-07-2015, 05:24 PM
I think a future improvement would be to redesign how the underside of our coaches are setup. Currently the chloroplast is mounted in one continuous piece with no real ability to remove and work in sections. I think in areas that have protrusions through the underbelly a panel could be added that can easily slide out of the way for inspections and maintenance. It is just a thought.

MTPockets
05-07-2015, 05:59 PM
It's simple to cut a hatch into the corroplast, do what needs done, then Gorilla tape the seam back in place.

JanAndBill
05-07-2015, 07:07 PM
I think a future improvement would be to redesign how the underside of our coaches are setup. Currently the chloroplast is mounted in one continuous piece with no real ability to remove and work in sections. I think in areas that have protrusions through the underbelly a panel could be added that can easily slide out of the way for inspections and maintenance. It is just a thought.

After fighting with that crap twice in less than a year to get to the tank valves, I finally used a piece of 10 ga aluminum plate that I had in the shop to fabricate an access hatch. Now all i have to do is back out the screws and drop the hatch.

Frankly they could rethink a lot of the underside. If you open the bulkhead and look, you'll see a "rats nest" of wires, flexible water lines, cables, etc. I can't believe they wouldn't save money by making up wiring harnesses, and organizing plumbing lines in a bundle, as opposed to just throwing it in there.

Paul.craven
05-08-2015, 07:57 AM
That sounds like a great mod, could you please take a picture of the underbelly access hatch and email it me? paul.craven@heartlandrvs.com

Thanks.

Silverado23
05-08-2015, 09:18 AM
Take a trip to the factory and watch how they assemble these things. You'll understand why they use a single big piece of coroplast and have a new level of understanding why you see the rats nest of wires. These guys and gals seem to move swiftly around as they build these things. It really is an eye opening experience.

Bones
05-08-2015, 10:43 AM
Take a trip to the factory and watch how they assemble these things. You'll understand why they use a single big piece of coroplast and have a new level of understanding why you see the rats nest of wires. These guys and gals seem to move swiftly around as they build these things. It really is an eye opening experience.

I watched the videos and I see how fast they move. Something like developing a harness that works with certain brands would help in speed as well as longevity

Silverado23
05-08-2015, 10:45 AM
I watched the videos and I see how fast they move. Something like developing a harness that works with certain brands would help in speed as well as longevity

At least on the North trail line I saw, They were building wiring harnesses for installation along the same area of the plant that they put the coroplast on the frame.

sengli
05-10-2015, 08:03 AM
On SOB they have access to the underside of the chassis, via zippered hatches. I know on my elkridge, the dealer just sliced the coroplast and didnt even tape it up, after a warranty plumbing repair. So far on my big horn we havent had to open it up. I hand drilled several holes in the coroplast so it could self drain, due to water ingress during transport in the rain.

danemayer
05-10-2015, 08:41 AM
On SOB they have access to the underside of the chassis, via zippered hatches.

Flex-Mend Trap Flap at the bottom of this page (https://mobilehomedepotmi.com/mh_catalog1/underbellyvapor.html).

avvidclif
05-10-2015, 09:31 AM
Thank you Dan, site is bookmarked.

donr827
05-10-2015, 11:21 AM
My 04 Carriage had zippers at areas that you might need to access. Needed to use the one at the holding tank valves one time. It probably would add time and cost to construction of a trailer.
Don

toolguy1964
07-18-2015, 02:08 PM
You know Silverado23; that is exactly the problem, the workers moving swiftly around as they build these things. Instead of the engineers using their brains for good and engineering each component in a "group" like a wiring harness or group of water supply lines running through an area that hidden but easily accessable instead of the jumbled rat's nest they have under these things, there would probably be much less failure in those components and if they do fail or maintenance needs to be performed, they would be easily accessable and much less costly to repair. Oh, wait! That's too logical, what am I thinking? These engineers and workers just want to throw these things together and get them to the dealers so the dealers can "rebuild" them. There is no pride or quality in workmanship in any of these units. Even Winnebago and Airstream have their issues but nothing like Thor products.

swburbguy
07-18-2015, 02:26 PM
When workers work on a quota system ,the faster they get done the earlier they go home

toolguy1964
07-18-2015, 04:17 PM
When workers work on a quota system ,the faster they get done the earlier they go home

That is true. I digress, it starts at the top (CEO) who probably has never held a wrench or hammer in his/her hand in their lives and tickles down to the assembly line workers. No pride in workmanship. These things should never leave the factory with as many issues as ours did. When you pay the kind of money we paid , you expect to get a decent product. Not something that looks like a couple of 12 year olds threw together.

swburbguy
07-18-2015, 04:45 PM
On normal jobs if you don't do it right you get your walking papers ,run a few maybe the rest wake up. But maybe the bosses are getting bonuses.

donr827
07-19-2015, 04:46 AM
I believe that since the economic recovery and the big increase of RV sales manufacturers have hired a lot of new assembly line workers. Maybe not well trained. Workers are under pressure to get trailers out the door quicker for $$$$$. JMO.
Don

buddyboy
07-19-2015, 06:28 AM
Hi, swburbguy and toolguy1964. I am a bit confused. Do y'all own Heartland products or are your comments referencing the RV industry in general?

Martha

swburbguy
07-19-2015, 06:32 AM
RV industry in general . For the money we spend on our rigs ,we have way too many problems.

buddyboy
07-19-2015, 06:59 AM
RV industry in general . For the money we spend on our rigs ,we have way too many problems.

I see. Well honestly if you factor the number of postings with problems vs the number of units sold, seems like the number of problems aren't really that huge. Also some problems are self-inflicted by not doing routine checks and maintenance or ignoring small issues until they become big problems. We're guilty of that ourselves (big flood when a hose blew out this summer when our water regulator failed). We'd noticed last year that it wasn't functioning properly, but didn't take time to replace it. Was it the manufacturer's fault, nope ours.

Not to say that there are no errors in engineering or manufacturer of these RVs. JMO

Martha

JanAndBill
07-19-2015, 07:15 AM
[QUOTE=toolguy1964;433620]You know Silverado23; that is exactly the problem, the workers moving swiftly around as they build these things. Instead of the engineers using their brains for good and engineering each component in a "group" like a wiring harness or group of water supply lines running through an area that hidden but easily accessable instead of the jumbled rat's nest they have under these things, there would probably be much less failure in those components and if they do fail or maintenance needs to be performed, they would be easily accessable and much less costly to repair.

I've said the same thing before. These are not "custom" units with each layout being different. Why they don't use pre-made wiring harnesses and plumbing packs is beyond me. Seems to me that it would have to save them money. The rats nest of wires and plumbing behind the bulkhead on ours is atrocious. I've cleaned up some of it, but still have more to go. As to other accessories/options/ etc. they're no different than other manufacturer's, if enough are willing to pay for an option, before long someone will offer it. When they do, the others will follow suit quickly.

MCTalley
07-19-2015, 08:46 AM
When we took the plant tour in 2013 (Big Country, Bighorn, Landmark), the person giving the tour then said they have pre-made wiring harnesses for all the different models.

Also, they've come a long way in neatness of wiring and plumbing (at least behind the basement and UDC on our coach). I need to take a picture sometime. Nobody believes our wiring bundle and plumbing was so neat out of the factory.

buddyboy
07-19-2015, 08:52 AM
When we took the plant tour in 2013 (Big Country, Bighorn, Landmark), the person giving the tour then said they have pre-made wiring harnesses for all the different models.

Also, they've come a long way in neatness of wiring and plumbing (at least behind the basement and UDC on our coach). I need to take a picture sometime. Nobody believes our wiring bundle and plumbing was so neat out of the factory.

They told us the same during our tour in the summer of 2012. Ours is also neat, so thought maybe I was either remembering wrong or our BH was a special instance.

justafordguy
07-19-2015, 11:02 AM
The wiring and plumbing behind the basement wall on our Gateway is a huge mess. There is no way this was done with a harness.:p