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TxCowboy
08-23-2015, 03:39 PM
For those using the induction cooktops, is there a notable difference, other that price, between Induction cookware and "induction ready" cookware?

The information I'm finding online isn't very clear on this subject.

Thanks!

jbeletti
08-23-2015, 04:00 PM
I'd assume it's one in the same.

I've used a variety of brands and styles on my induction at home and in the RV.

For Non-Stick, we like the Circulon Infinite collection (link (http://shop.circulon.com/infinite-circulon-cookware.html))

For regular, we like Calphalon tri-ply stainless collection (link (http://store.calphalon.com/department/cookware-sets/1949-4294965530-1982-1957#title=stainless-steel-cookware-sets-tri-ply-stainless&siteid=1949-4294965530-1982-1957-4294963079-4294957819&size=24&page=1&sortkey=bestselling&pagetype=department)). We got ours on-sale at Bed Bath and Beyond.

More recently, a friend turned me onto Ozeri. Got one and LOVE IT (link (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EKTO0YE)).

alwayslooking
08-23-2015, 04:16 PM
Induction cookware has to be magnetized. Not all stainless is magnetized and, of course, aluminum isn't either. You probably will only need 2 or 3 pots and pans for most of your cooking. You'll probably find that the cost of buying 2 or 3 of quality pots and pans will be almost as much as buying a 10 piece set. Amazon is a good place to look. Costco, if you are a member, has a really good 13 piece set of stainless for $176. Some good online resources are:
http://www.allcookwarefind.com/Stainless-Steel/
http://www.potsandpansplace.com/category/stainless-steel/

I have also seen some cookery (pots and pans) that is magnetized steel but has a Teflon interior. If you are in Texas near an HEB, they had some individual pans that were induction capable with Teflon interiors. A good, high quality stainless pot or pan would probably be a better bet. Stainless cleans as easily a Teflon provided you use it properly and don't burn your food.

Induction heats really fast, like gas, maybe more so. The heat is instant to the pan when you turn it on. And, with good cookery, medium heat settings will be all that is required. You'll have to be careful or you'll burn your food. Most who cook on induction really like it once they get use to it.

Congratulations on your new rig! It is spectacular.

TxCowboy
08-23-2015, 04:17 PM
Thanks, Jim. I actually read your thread from 2014 and looked at the links. Good stuff but PRICEY! Of course, you get what you pay for. :)

avvidclif
08-23-2015, 04:26 PM
Thanks, Jim. I actually read your thread from 2014 and looked at the links. Good stuff but PRICEY! Of course, you get what you pay for. :)

When I was shopping for cookware to use I carried a small pocket magnet. If it stuck to the bottom it was good.

pegmikef
08-23-2015, 06:52 PM
I used one of my welding magnets to check all of ours and surprisingly I found that our high dollar LeCreuset enameled pots work just fine on induction cook top. http://www.amazon.com/Creuset-Signature-Enameled-3-5-Quart-Caribbean/dp/B00QH6VGHM/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1440373784&sr=8-3&keywords=le+creuset+outlet

Jesstruckn/Jesstalkn
08-23-2015, 08:11 PM
Back to your Question, I think they are both the same thing.
As long as the magnet sticks to the bottom they will work. we did find the smooth flat bottom of our Zwilling JA Henckels set with the ceramic coating http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store/product/zwilling-reg-energy-10-piece-ceramic-coated-stainless-steel-cookware-set-and-open-stock/210606 worked a lot better then the T-fal Professional set we tried first.

jbeletti
08-23-2015, 08:40 PM
I used one of my welding magnets to check all of ours and surprisingly I found that our high dollar LeCreuset enameled pots work just fine on induction cook top. http://www.amazon.com/Creuset-Signature-Enameled-3-5-Quart-Caribbean/dp/B00QH6VGHM/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1440373784&sr=8-3&keywords=le+creuset+outlet

At home, we too have several enamel Le Creuset (and Lodge) pieces we use regularly. Cast iron is not optimal for induction cooking but it can be done. A couple of key points for those new to this. Cast iron should be heated up slowly. Induction has the capability to throw a lot of power/heat into a pan very fast. Best to start low and move up slow with cast iron. Also, cast iron is a huge heatsink. Therefore, cooking with cast iron on induction means you will not have instant and fine control over heat as you will with stainless steel pans.

We use our enamel cast iron with induction cooking for things like soups, stews, sauces, braises, browning and such. Love induction. So flexible.

pegmikef
08-24-2015, 06:06 PM
Thanks for the tip on cast iron Jim. We are really novices to this and got the idea after Peggy attended the seminar at Goshen (thanks for setting that up too).