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View Full Version : ATF: Road Warrior - Installing wheel chocks in garage



Darren
04-25-2016, 12:45 PM
I am wanting to install my wheel chocks in the garage of my new RW415 for my Harley. I want to have it a more secure than just screwing into the plywood. has anyone installed a wheel chock or possibly a track system into their RW garage? Thank you.

jimtoo
04-25-2016, 04:07 PM
Hi Darren,

Welcome to the Heartland Owners Forum and to the family. We have a great bunch of folks here with lots of information and all willing to share their knowledge when needed.

Be sure and check out our Heartland Owners Club (//heartlandowners.org/content.php/128-heartland-owners-club-portal). Join us at a rally when you can and meet lots of the great folks here and make friends for a lifetime.

Enjoy the forum and your new unit.

Jim M

Thread moved to better area also.

IronJ
04-25-2016, 10:59 PM
I have a removable Condor in mine...bolted through the floor...

I also have a smaller cheaper removable on made for scooters for my Honda grom...

Have worked fine thus far...moab and back...

I still use the factory direct rings for my straps...

sent from space via an invisible beam from a flying metal dish

Darren
04-25-2016, 11:13 PM
Thanks for the reply. I will look at bolting mine down as well and using the existing d rings if you have had good luck with them.

Jesstruckn/Jesstalkn
04-26-2016, 12:43 AM
I did 3 runs of E-track on my toy-hauler 1 on each sides and one down the middle. I put self tapping screws in every other hole and bolts through every cross member. The E-track with the removable hooks gives you a verity of configurations as your needs change over the years. They can be a trip hazard if you don't remove the hooks. If we were using the garage I would remove the hooks and roll out the carpet.

NWILSON
04-26-2016, 07:24 AM
I installed a Bike-Pro and was able to get some of the bolts through a frame crossmember. It just takes a little measuring. I'd strongly recommend using large "fender" washers or better yet a backing plate to spread the load over a larger area of the plywood flooring for the bolts that won't go through the frame.

Darren
04-27-2016, 10:33 AM
Thanks for the responses. I have Bike Pro chocks as well. Is the area under the garage enclosed or is it just the fuel tanks? I'm just wondering if a guy can get under it to put backing plates on under the plywood.

porthole
04-28-2016, 09:17 PM
If your floor is the 1" of plywood it is supposed to be, I think it is overkill with the backing plates.
If you want to bolt them down you should be able to get two of the bolts in one of the steel cross members under the floor and two bolts just into the plywood. Fender washers work good for that.

I used beveled aluminum track in our trailer, lots of it. I prefer it over the E-track stuff. As I mentioned in the other thread you started, I do not bother bolting down my Condor chocks anymore. Properly secured the bike does not move.
I did start out with Bike Pro chocks, they were bolted as they offer no support without the plate or bolting down.

- - - Updated - - -

You can get an idea of what I did here

https://heartlandowners.org/showthread.php/11365-And-so-it-begins?p=123837&viewfull=1#post123837
(https://heartlandowners.org/showthread.php/11365-And-so-it-begins?p=123837&viewfull=1#post123837)
and here

https://heartlandowners.org/showthread.php/11365-And-so-it-begins?p=262148&viewfull=1#post262148

Darren
04-30-2016, 09:09 AM
I was looking at the bevelled aluminum and may end up putting some in my trailer as well. I will know better in a couple months when I get a chance to play around with it. I'm a farmer and just sold 1/3 of my farm hence the reason I could afford a new toy hauler and a new Harley to throw in the back. Been busy moving stuff from one farm to the other and now it's seeding time so no time to play. I hope to get at it this summer and try it for a weekend or two to work out the bugs and then go south to Arizona and Texas with it all for a couple months this winter.

Sarge
08-14-2016, 02:07 AM
The wheel chock doesn't need to support the entire bike - Just keep the front wheel straight and provide some stability.

Your doubled up straps will keep it locked down just fine.

Front 4 straps to the neck - 4 straps at rear to keep it from sliding.

I run the rear straps through the rim twice and back to the eye.

Do NOT strap down by the handlebar or crash bars. Don't ask...

nfa1eab
08-22-2016, 07:17 AM
I use a Baxley Sport Chock. Very sturdy, and is used in garage at home to park bike. I put a length of 2x4 down on the floor (width of garage) up against the back of the sliding glass door, just to space the chock away a bit. Butt the chock up to the 2x4, drive bike in. You can then get off and tie down in front and rear using the D-rings. Front and rear both pulling forward. Bike has never moved, even over very large whoopdie doos. No screws in floor.

Sent from my SM-T900 using Tapatalk

travelingcamper_2017
04-23-2017, 09:06 AM
I am all knew to mounting things in the garage.I have a 2004 ultra classic Harley bagger.Purchased a winch,but not real sure a great way to mount,as the floor is plywood.I just am trying to rule out any problems way ahead of time.I have a tank under my floor so cannot get to anything under it.Any ideas would be helpful

porthole
04-25-2017, 12:59 PM
I am all knew to mounting things in the garage.I have a 2004 ultra classic Harley bagger.Purchased a winch,but not real sure a great way to mount,as the floor is plywood.I just am trying to rule out any problems way ahead of time.I have a tank under my floor so cannot get to anything under it.Any ideas would be helpful

I answered your PM and here is a link to the winch I installed.
Something not mentioned in the original winch post is the need for something for the cable to ride over at the beaver tail. I use a block of HDPE (plastic) for that purpose.
Without the block the cable will cut through the floor after it is loaded.

Dennyha
04-25-2017, 01:54 PM
I switched to a Biker Bar, made by B&W. It is extremely sturdy, and makes it easy to load the bike by myself. There are no straps or ratchets to deal with. I had to drill two holes through the floor of the garage, and screw two backing plates underneath the floor. When I remove the biker bar, I have two nylon plug caps I stick into the holes, and you can hardly see that there were holes there. To mount the biker bar, I pull the nylon plug caps, place the biker bar mount over the two holes, and insert two bolts (screw into the backer plates attached underneath the floor). Done! Then I attach a cross bar underneath the frame of the bike, and drive it up into the mount. All secure.

avvidclif
04-25-2017, 05:15 PM
I switched to a Biker Bar, made by B&W. It is extremely sturdy, and makes it easy to load the bike by myself. There are no straps or ratchets to deal with. I had to drill two holes through the floor of the garage, and screw two backing plates underneath the floor. When I remove the biker bar, I have two nylon plug caps I stick into the holes, and you can hardly see that there were holes there. To mount the biker bar, I pull the nylon plug caps, place the biker bar mount over the two holes, and insert two bolts (screw into the backer plates attached underneath the floor). Done! Then I attach a cross bar underneath the frame of the bike, and drive it up into the mount. All secure.

How did you seal the bottom of the holes so water doesn't get on the plywood or particle board floor coming up from underneath??? That's my only concern.

Dennyha
04-25-2017, 07:10 PM
How did you seal the bottom of the holes so water doesn't get on the plywood or particle board floor coming up from underneath??? That's my only concern.
After installing the backer plates on the bottom, I sprayed a couple of coats of the black Flex-Seal. It sealed the plate, and closed the bolt hole on the bottom.