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hut
10-13-2018, 10:22 PM
Any recommendations on an late 90s early 2000s puller? Weve bought a Big Country with a GVWR of 15,500 and a hitch weight of 2,200. I havent weighed it, but were living in it currently, so its loaded up....

Looking at prices, Im going to have to back up a few years. We wont pull often, but Id like to be able go when I want to.

Ive heard horror stories concerning those year models diesels. Is a big block gas fine? Do I need 350/3500, or would a 250/2500 suffice? Brands and equipment - Im all ears!

Oldelevatorman
10-13-2018, 11:04 PM
Any recommendations on an late 90s early 2000s puller? Weve bought a Big Country with a GVWR of 15,500 and a hitch weight of 2,200. I havent weighed it, but were living in it currently, so its loaded up....

Looking at prices, Im going to have to back up a few years. We wont pull often, but Id like to be able go when I want to.

Ive heard horror stories concerning those year models diesels. Is a big block gas fine? Do I need 350/3500, or would a 250/2500 suffice? Brands and equipment - Im all ears!

First off its pin weight, not hitch weight and if youre loaded up at GVWR your pin is at least 3100 or 20% minimum. First thing Id do is go to a Cat scale and weigh your BC so you know your actual weight; axles, pin etc. If you have a way to get it to a scale. At minimum Id look for a 3500 SRW (single rear wheel). You want enough payload for the pin weight of the trailer and everything else you put in the truck: fuel, passengers, tools etc. and I like a little extra for safety. Diesel would be better for towing imo.
Someone will chime in on an older year truck brand that will work. YouTube is a good resource as well. Good luck and safe travels!


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hut
10-13-2018, 11:32 PM
First off its pin weight, not hitch weight and if youre loaded up at GVWR your pin is at least 3100 or 20% minimum. First thing Id do is go to a Cat scale and weigh your BC so you know your actual weight; axles, pin etc. If you have a way to get it to a scale. At minimum Id look for a 3500 SRW (single rear wheel). You want enough payload for the pin weight of the trailer and everything else you put in the truck: fuel, passengers, tools etc. and I like a little extra for safety. Diesel would be better for towing imo.
Someone will chime in on an older year truck brand that will work. YouTube is a good resource as well. Good luck and safe travels!


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Ah, the 20% makes sense now.

Is there a difference in hitch and pin terminology? Heartland lists it as hitch.

Oldelevatorman
10-14-2018, 12:23 AM
Ah, the 20% makes sense now.

Is there a difference in hitch and pin terminology? Heartland lists it as hitch.

Trailer hitch or hitch weight is typically for a travel trailer. A fifth wheel has a pin box, so that weight is called pin weight. That 2200 was probably dry weight of the empty fifth wheel but no one tows an unloaded trailer/fifth wheel.


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hut
10-14-2018, 08:53 AM
Trailer hitch or hitch weight is typically for a travel trailer. A fifth wheel has a pin box, so that weight is called pin weight. That 2200 was probably dry weight of the empty fifth wheel but no one tows an unloaded trailer/fifth wheel.


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Ok. Just trying to understand. Heartland listed it as "hitch weight" on our particular fifth wheel model. I'm learning! :)

BouseBill
10-14-2018, 09:59 AM
Try looking for a 2006 F-350, You should be able to find one with low miles at a decent price, diesel engine would be better for heavy towing IMHO.

You will find all opinions on this Forum, so find something YOU like and can afford.

hut
10-14-2018, 12:16 PM
Try looking for a 2006 F-350, You should be able to find one with low miles at a decent price, diesel engine would be better for heavy towing IMHO.

You will find all opinions on this Forum, so find something YOU like and can afford.


Good deal! Thanks!

wdk450
10-14-2018, 01:58 PM
I have to chime in that a lot of us believe in the reliability of the Dodge/Cummins combination and seem to have had a very small history of drivetrain problems.

CDN
10-14-2018, 02:34 PM
One weak area will all 2k engines is fuel pump. If they hatch the common rail or fuel distribution parts need to be replaced including injectors. Costly repair. Also glow plugs sometime fail and removing they break off. Better a engine with some work done even if it was rebuild or hardening for some Ford SD engines 6. and 6.4 l. Buddy had a 1999 Cummins and has done all the fuel upgrade at the side of the road, he was a mechanic so parts were $3,000 for everything.

MTPockets
10-14-2018, 03:45 PM
You need at least Diesel engine F350DRW, or 3500 series Ford, Chevy, or Dodge. The pin weight dictates, and I see no other choice, especially in the older models... P.S., I realize many will say I have no problem towing with my SRW, but I always go with actual factory limits for a specific vehicle, not generalities or averages.

Gaffer
10-15-2018, 12:29 PM
Don't buy a 6 liter Ford diesel without researching serious model year problems.

CarterKraft
10-15-2018, 12:54 PM
Early Dodge auto transmissions are garbage, if an auto is a requirement I'd look at a Ford or Chevy.

A 2002 Chevy/GMC with a Duramax/Allison would be a strong combo. I would look for a dually personally as the demand on the rear tires is half what a single is.

Shortest Straw
10-15-2018, 03:02 PM
If you need to go back that far in the ford arena try and find a 7.3 if you can. For the weight you will be pulling you will need a DRW and I say that from experience. The only reason Ford quit producing that motor was the emission standards of the Feds. That motor was replaced with the really horrible 6.0. That motor was so bad that the ambulance company I worked for got rid of all of them year two because we were always breaking down on our way to calls. That motor only lasted about 3 years in production it was so bad. Then the next disaster the 6.4 liter came out. It only lasted 3 years in production as well. Although better as a motor the emission package made it unreliable. We had a bunch of those in service as ambulances as well and the company started giving those back almost immediately. You can put a bunch of money into the 6.0 and the 6.4 to make them somewhat reliable but they will not meet emission standards when you are done. The company I worked for also tried a Chevy D-max package and one Dodge package but neither lasted long due to grenade-ing transmissions. Whatever brand you decide to go with I believe the gassers are fairly reliable. The decision to get a diesel to me hinges on how much you plan to tow and where.

Gaffer
10-15-2018, 07:37 PM
There were years where injectors were a big problem with the Chevys. Do not know the details or if there was an economical solution.

wdk450
10-15-2018, 09:21 PM
Dodge DID have lift pump (like regular low pressure fuel pump) problems with the Cummins engines around 2000 - 2005. They had the fuel pump mounted behind the fuel filter that is mounted on the engine on the driver's side near the firewall. 1. it was pulling (sucking) the fuel all the way from the tank which is an invitation for air in the fuel problems, which diesels don't like (and can be VERY intermittent). 2. The fuel pump was getting too hot in the engine compartment environment and intermittently failing. This caused intermittent stalling. Dodge did a recall, and mounted the lift fuel pump IN the fuel tank, cooled by fuel, pumping low pressure fuel to the fuel filter under the hood. No more stalling problems. This is standard configuration 2005 and onward.

rhodies1
10-16-2018, 05:40 AM
If you go with a Chev try looking for a 2006 model or up.. from 2002 to 2005 they had injector issues.
With Ford the 6.0 litre was a PITA and disastrous,Ford has agreed to repair due to law suit but still un- reliable.Dodge had their issues as well...none are perfect.It will be hit or miss as to what you find and condition.

rhodies1
10-16-2018, 06:13 AM
Hut,go to the following web site and look at all the older pullers they have for sale,around the 2006 year range. Good supply of inventory.

Bill@powerstrokehelp.com

good luck

CarterKraft
10-16-2018, 09:41 AM
All the Duramax injector issues have long since been resolved by now, much like the Dodge lift pumps etc.
All Duramax's have a suction fuel system like the Dodge mentioned and can cause CP3/4 injection pump failure.


The 6.0 Fords are from 03-07 and the 6.4 from 08-10, if buying one of these trucks be very careful with inquiring as to the maintenance history and modifications that have been performed, these trucks are some of the most powerful "ticking" time bombs on the road, and would not fall into my category of RV hauler.
I'd take less power and higher reliability.

99-2003 Ford 7.3's are pretty tough but they are pretty low powered by todays standards. They have some expensive fuel system parts like the Duramax but are generally tough trucks, decent transmissions and drivetrains.