Induction Cooktop / Special brand of pans needed?

randolu

Active Member
I purchased a new set of pans that state they are for use on induction cooktops. We tried one and it was working until my husband lifted it off the cooktop and then it shut off. We were not able to get it to go on again. It flashes like the cookware is not the right kind. The set of pans we purchased were Circulon Symmetry. Has anyone else had problems with their pans and is there a certain brand that works the best???
 

TxCowboy

Well-known member
DW and I are not experts on induction cookware but we both agree that Circulon Symmetry cookware may not have enough iron in the metal to work well on an induction cooktop. Induction cooktops require a certain amount of ferrous (iron - magnetic) material to operate correctly. A lot of cookware says it is induction compatible which is a fancy way of saying that it "kinda, sorta" works with induction technology.

Buy some that clearly states it is made for Induction cooking.

BTW, as I'm sure you've noticed, good induction cookware is pretty expensive. If you're going to do a lot of cooking, don't skimp. Get the good stuff. We purchased a set of Duxtop from Amazon and it works fine. We may upgrade to a more non-stick version of Duxtop or a similar brand in the future. :cool:
 

randolu

Active Member
DW and I are not experts on induction cookware but we both agree that Circulon Symmetry cookware may not have enough iron in the metal to work well on an induction cooktop. Induction cooktops require a certain amount of ferrous (iron - magnetic) material to operate correctly. A lot of cookware says it is induction compatible which is a fancy way of saying that it "kinda, sorta" works with induction technology.

Buy some that clearly states it is made for Induction cooking.

BTW, as I'm sure you've noticed, good induction cookware is pretty expensive. If you're going to do a lot of cooking, don't skimp. Get the good stuff. We purchased a set of Duxtop from Amazon and it works fine. We may upgrade to a more non-stick version of Duxtop or a similar brand in the future. :cool:

This set wasn't cheap.....at least I didn't think so. They were $300.
 

GregP

Well-known member
I agree with Jeff, the pots may not have enough iron content for the induction cooktop. One way of testing is to try a magnet (fridge magnet will do) on the base of the cookware. If it sticks, it should be OK for the induction cooktop. Copper bottom pans will not work, nor will aluminum cookware.
 

randolu

Active Member
I agree with Jeff, the pots may not have enough iron content for the induction cooktop. One way of testing is to try a magnet (fridge magnet will do) on the base of the cookware. If it sticks, it should be OK for the induction cooktop. Copper bottom pans will not work, nor will aluminum cookware.

We did try the magnet trick and it stuck!
 

billk263

California-South Chapter Leaders
If you lift the pan off of the burner, I think the stove will power it's self off. Might need to touch the power button again to restart it.


Bill & Irene

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jbeletti

Well-known member
It would seem from their website (link) that this pan collection is induction compatible.

Have you tried both burners? Other pans from the same set? Unplug the cooktop and replug and retry?

If you tried all the above to no avail - I suggest you contact True Induction Customer Service (877-862-7049) to see what they have to say. Explain that the magnet test worked as did the pan - once.

On Edit:

Thought about this a bit more. Here's how the stove works.

Place pan on stove
Press Power Button
Press Heat Button
Use + / - to select heat level

When a pan is removed, the unit will beep and eventually, returning the pan to the stove will NOT make it turn back on. Returning the pan within a quick amount of time will allow the burner to remain on. Couple of seconds max.

Have you tried to return the pan to the burner and repeat the above steps (Power, then Heat)?
 

TravelTiger

Founding Texas-West Chapter Leaders
Just FYI, I found NuWave brand cookware (NuWave makes induction cooktops) at Walmart at a reasonable price.


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farside291

Well-known member
We have the NuWave cookware and found it worked very well for a while. After many uses in about a year the non-stick coating started to stick. We since have purchased pans made by Anolan. They make an induction ready line and they have worked very well for over two years. Anolon-Nouvelle-Anodized-Nonstick-11-Piece induction suitable. Get them through Amazon. We love them. We use induction both at home and on the road. I honestly don't know if the stove or oven even work in the Big Country.
 

wdk450

Well-known member
Just to test the induction burner, get yourself a piece of old time cast iron cookware. If it doesn't work with that, you have an induction range problem.
 

Bohemian

Well-known member
Aluminum answer stainless steel should NOT work.

Anything with a magnetic material should work. Low grade SS might work, but inefficiently.

Aluminum clad steel should work.

I think that if you want to spend a lot of money there are speciality pans that are SS with an intended magnetic core.

Buy a set you like, tell the sales person you need to try 9ne out. See how long it takes to boil 1 quart of water.
 

TravelTiger

Founding Texas-West Chapter Leaders
During our PDI, we did bring a pot and boil some water on the induction stove prior to purchase.
 

PNG68

Member
I purchased a new set of pans that state they are for use on induction cooktops. We tried one and it was working until my husband lifted it off the cooktop and then it shut off. We were not able to get it to go on again. It flashes like the cookware is not the right kind. The set of pans we purchased were Circulon Symmetry. Has anyone else had problems with their pans and is there a certain brand that works the best???
We have had to turn breaker off and then back on to get the stovetop to reset.

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Rhyph

Well-known member
I extracted a post I had made in the past to another thread:

We have been cooking on induction for over a decade, wouldn't leave home without it. Beyond magnetism, one of the important properties for induction cookware is in the layers or plies of steel running from the center-bottom of the cookware to the outer edges and then up the sidewalls. This helps with transferring the heat evenly around and up the sidewalls of the cookware. Some of your lower cost cookware does not have the plies running throughout and up the sidewalls. It's this property which is not a hard and fast technical requirement that used to scare people away from induction, along with the no copper bottom and cheap aluminum stuff since those won't work. You want something of reasonable quality and will not change shape when heated. Some cheaper cookware will go from being flat-bottom to rounded when heated and that causes the outer edges of the cookware to rise off the glass and become less efficient to heat, not to mention rock back and forth on a glass top range.

At home we use All-Clad cookware, if you don't mind dropping the bux on it, it's the best you can buy. Just look for anything with the induction symbol on it and is multi-ply, or visit something like a Williams and Sonoma for guidance. Alternatively Cuisinart makes a great knock off that we also own and I find myself reaching for it more often for every day abuse (also available at Costco). Lastly, I've heard generally good things about Costco's Kirkland brand of stainless cookware. You'll note that on pretty much all of the recommendations, they're all tri-ply which is the key to success. ;)
 
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