Dripping where it shouldn’t

thewanderingeight

Active Member
The above advice from TravelTiger is an easy and great place to start.

If this does not solve the issue, I would suggest dropping the coroplast to see what's going on. I never wanted to drop mine either, but after our fresh tank overflowed due to a failed check valve, I had to drop it to let all the water out. It's really not as bad as it seems. The fasteners they use to hold it up from the factory are a pain to get out, but I just used a small pry bar and hammer to work them loose and then pull them out with a pair of channel locks. Once I was done with what I needed, I re-used the washer and used a screw instead of what they had originally used for easy access next time I had to get back in there.

Happy issue hunting!
 

TravelTiger

Founding Texas-West Chapter Leaders
The above advice from TravelTiger is an easy and great place to start.

If this does not solve the issue, I would suggest dropping the coroplast to see what's going on. I never wanted to drop mine either, but after our fresh tank overflowed due to a failed check valve, I had to drop it to let all the water out. It's really not as bad as it seems. The fasteners they use to hold it up from the factory are a pain to get out, but I just used a small pry bar and hammer to work them loose and then pull them out with a pair of channel locks. Once I was done with what I needed, I re-used the washer and used a screw instead of what they had originally used for easy access next time I had to get back in there.

Happy issue hunting!

Thanks for the suggestion, original author will probably not have those fasteners on their underbelly. Likely screws, best removed with an impact driver. The underbelly is a challenge to take down. Most of what is leaking will be accessible first by taking the wall down. A visible leak coming from the underbelly does need to be accessed from the underbelly to determine damage if any, as you said, from water collecting there.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

bigheart

Member
The above advice from TravelTiger is an easy and great place to start.

If this does not solve the issue, I would suggest dropping the coroplast to see what's going on. I never wanted to drop mine either, but after our fresh tank overflowed due to a failed check valve, I had to drop it to let all the water out. It's really not as bad as it seems. The fasteners they use to hold it up from the factory are a pain to get out, but I just used a small pry bar and hammer to work them loose and then pull them out with a pair of channel locks. Once I was done with what I needed, I re-used the washer and used a screw instead of what they had originally used for easy access next time I had to get back in there.

Happy issue hunting!
I'm hoping I do not have to remove that underbelly, but your suggestion is appreciated. I think it may all seem a bit more daunting that it is, maybe.
 

david-steph2018

Well-known member
I found this thread when searching 'underbelly'. I've been smelling a musty odor since the Texas winter storm, emanating from the furnace area, which I realized was coming from the storage area, and I'm guessing, the underbelly. Something must've cracked, and maybe it's a slow leak, otherwise it seems I would have more of a problem.

I admire your ability to get in there, figure it out, and fix it. This being my first RV, and not being at all savvy is such respects. I'm still trying to figure out how to proceed. My son is not comfortable poking around in there since he does not know what he's looking for, or doing. Any advice would be helpful. I'll likely have to hire someone, but am trying to troubleshoot first, and see if it's something we may be able to figure out. My budget requires that.
As suggested you need to look behind the wall and see if something is very obvious as causing the issue. You may open it up and the issue right in front of you or it could be complicated. We had a water leak issue once in there and it turned out to be the inlet line to the water heater had cracked and was leaking. Luckily we were still under the warranty period and Heartland pre-authorized a mobile repair guy to come out and fix it.
You did not say how old your unit is or if it is still under the warranty period.
Tools for getting in there are a reversible drill/driver with a square #2 bit. for our unit.
 

bigheart

Member
I have a 2009 BigHorn. I did take a look behind the wall a few times the last few weeks, and for the first time yesterday saw a small leak coming from the hose that goes to the winterization knob. This cannot be the (sole) source, and I'm perplexed as to how it's even leaking given I've not used winterization.

Thanks for your tips. Gonna keep digging. I suspect it may be something a bit more labor intensive, bu we'll see.
 
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