PDA

View Full Version : water-filters



Draco Dog
02-08-2011, 03:55 AM
We are full-timers. Have a 3670 38' 2010 Big Horn. We love our 5th wheel.

We are from Oregon and have never had to worry about having good water.

But, being in southwest, Arizona mostly, good water is not always available.

We have talked to many people and there is as many water filter sysems. It is very confusing.

We are have a couple of water filters on the outside of our 5th wheel.

But I'm thinking maybe we should have another filter inside.

We have had some recommend the Berkey Filter.

Any comments on the Berkey Filter.

I value everyone's opinion on this web-site. help. cheri

jpajax
02-08-2011, 08:16 AM
11932Put this one in mine witch excepts a wide range of filter material. Some others have put theirs in a tote with two whole house filters. You might use the search fetcher and find more info.

TXBobcat
02-08-2011, 08:52 AM
This is a website you might find the answer to your questions. These are fulltime RVer's that started their business while on the road. They have great information and great accessories.
RV Water Filter Store (http://www.rvwaterfilterstore.com/ABFiltration.htm) Filteration information.

I purchased a 36ft hose and don't have to carry an extra hose. I also purchased the 90* Kwik connector.

I keep my water filters on the outside of my trailer. I had one break and it flooded the basement of my SOB trailer. While here our water froze. Could have a problem if the canister froze and broke. We are on a City water system so I removed the filters while here.

BC

JohnDar
02-08-2011, 10:02 AM
We use the two canisters in a tote method. The first is a sediment filter and the second is a charcoal filter. We also have a pressure regulator in the system. The campground we stay at has good water, but it is well water and has some iron in it. By mid-summer, the sediment filter takes on a light orange tint, telling me to replace it. Before switching the regulator to the output side of the filters, the inner screen got clogged by orange crud by the end of the summer (photo is earlier set up).

If you have quality filters outside, it should not be necessary to add another inside the coach.

With the canister filters in a tote, changing them is very easy. Unless you've jam-packed your basement with a lot of extra stuff, the tote sits right in the door when not in use. Also makes a good place to store your extra water fittings/hoses/etc. Mounted inside the rig invites spillage onto surfaces that don't like getting wet. Our TT came with a canister filter under the sink. Getting it out to change meant dumping a lot of water under the cabinet due to the tight quarters.

I got everything from the RV Water Filter Store.

1193311934

Buford445
02-08-2011, 10:16 AM
I would like to make something like this but only Insulated so it won't freeze when used in the winter

JohnDar
02-08-2011, 10:47 AM
I would like to make something like this but only Insulated so it won't freeze when used in the winter

Drink a few beers before going to bed. You'll keep the water running enough that it won't have a chance to freeze.:D

Buford445
02-08-2011, 11:05 AM
Drink a few beers before going to bed. You'll keep the water running enough that it won't have a chance to freeze.:D

I'm OLD I don't need the Beers to keep the water flowing hahhaahahahaha

But it does Help :angel:

KENNY COCHRAN
02-24-2011, 10:18 PM
Mount your water filter inside the storage compt where it will be heated in the winter, no problem.

hoefler
02-25-2011, 08:11 AM
As said above, mount it inside the UDC compartment, it is heated. You really don't need more than one filter. We use a single charcoal filter in our UDC compartment. Charcoal filters are 5 micron and are for drinking water any ways. It filters all the water to our coach and any water that goes into the fresh water tank. By keeping it in the compartment, you have one less item to take up valuable storage space and weight.

JohnDar
02-25-2011, 08:33 AM
Considering that most pathogenic microbes are in the 2 - 4 micron range, I prefer the 0.5 micron carbon filters. A 1 micron sediment filter in front of it prolongs its service life. And since a number of people were worried about what the last camper did to the spigot, better filtration is added insurance that you won't catch what they left behind.

TandT
02-25-2011, 11:50 AM
Does anyone feel that using a series of filters slows water pressure? I had one filter in my SOB that really slowed it down. Had to take it out. Don't know if it was just the one I had, or if they all do it. Thanks, Trace

TXBobcat
02-25-2011, 12:19 PM
A lot depends on the thru put of your regulator. Most of the cheap ones have 2-2.5 Gal per minute. Mine has 6-6.5 GPM and I have no problem and I am using a white filter and a charcoal one. Both have a low micron but I don't remember right now.

BC

JohnDar
02-25-2011, 03:12 PM
The through-put on my 1 micron sediment filter is 3 - 4 gpm, as is the 0.5 micron carbon filter. The flow rate on the Watts N55BG regulator is 6 - 9 gpm. The filters and the regulator are about as high a flow rate as you can get. So yes, there is some flow reduction. The pressure entering my rig has been 42 - 44 psi at the campground we stay at. This same pressure was observed when I had the regulator upstream of the filters, as well as downstream. At the faucets, the flow and pressure have been more than adequate. The exception is the outside shower, which is very weak. I use a separate hose off my manifold and get full pressure from it.

lwmcguir
02-26-2011, 09:59 PM
Filters make sense and the two filter method is better than the combined charcoal/sediment unit. Never over use the charcoal filter though as they can become breeding grounds for bugs as they take out chlorine (if the water was chlorinated) also. I never use a charcoal filter more than one season and if it starts looking odd it is exchanged immediately. Buy the clear filter housings so you can see what is happening. They are what we use at the house as well ahead of the RO system and prior to the water softener. The small amount of flow reduction usually don't bother unless you have very low water pressure.

Draco Dog
03-02-2011, 12:26 AM
Thanks for all your responses. As always, you and your information is totally awesome.

jheitman
03-02-2011, 01:50 AM
I believe in filtering particles and microbes outside the rv but not cholorine.
I use a paper 1 micron pre filter for large stuff followed by a .5 micron ceramic filter.
This Combination can stop a lot of rust at some campgrounds, but the ceramic unit can be cleaned.

I believe one should strive to keep chlorine in the tanks and piping to inhibit the growth of bacteria.
If I load water in my fresh water tank, I add bleach to chlorinate it to the level found in most public water systems.
If there is chlorine in the camp water system, I want it in my rv water system.
However, I dont want to drink chlorinated water, so i mount my charcoal filter under the kitchen sink and have a special dedicated drinking water faucet .

Each year I disinfect the rv water system and then try to keep it clean throughout the year.
Seems to be working well so far.

I used to have some pressure issues as the filters loaded up with rust, but I moved my pressure regulator to the output side of my outside filter stack and haven't had a pressure problem since.

Ray LeTourneau
03-02-2011, 09:37 AM
Buy the clear filter housings so you can see what is happening. They are what we use at the house as well ahead of the RO system and prior to the water softener.
A word of caution using clear filter housings. Algae! If your filters are outside and exposed, you will get algae inside the filter housing and eventually this will start to move into your water system. Long story short, if you use clear housings, enclose them in a dark tote that will keep them from being exposed at all. Or plumb the filter into the basement somehow.

lwmcguir
03-02-2011, 04:01 PM
A word of caution using clear filter housings. Algae! If your filters are outside and exposed, you will get algae inside the filter housing and eventually this will start to move into your water system. Long story short, if you use clear housings, enclose them in a dark tote that will keep them from being exposed at all. Or plumb the filter into the basement somehow.

Quite true, I keep ours covered. Cyanobacteria loves sunlight.