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Coyote
01-15-2012, 06:39 PM
For the little cost and effort the water lines could be covered with pipe insulation to keep them from freezing in anything below 32 degrees which we see often in the southwest in winter. It's not just the Elkridge. I've talked with a number of Big Horn and Landmark owners that have had the same problem. To say the coach is good down to zero but neglect to say that your water lines inside the under belly will freeze in the anything uner 32 degrees needs to be addressed. Just believe they could do a lot better.

westxsrt10
01-15-2012, 08:44 PM
Insulating the piping won't help much.....the system requires the full time use of the furnace to heat the underbelly piping.

hoefler
01-15-2012, 09:44 PM
If you insulate the pipes in the under belly, you also insulate them from the heat. The best thing to do is to raise all the water lines off of the under belly and attach them high against the floor or next to the heating duct work. Them add more insulation along the frame and on the belly skin.

JohnDar
01-15-2012, 11:09 PM
I don't know about the Elkridge, but on Bighorn's, there's a small duct off the furnace that blows into the underbelly. Just how efficient that is remains questionable. Now, some folks complain about the heat into the bathroom or bedroom as being excessive. Would it be possible to install a diverter wye in one of those larger ducts to direct more furnace air into the underbelly via an additional duct hose?

RuralPastor
01-16-2012, 10:05 AM
If you insulate the pipes in the under belly, you also insulate them from the heat. The best thing to do is to raise all the water lines off of the under belly and attach them high against the floor or next to the heating duct work. Them add more insulation along the frame and on the belly skin.

Ditto. You might also consider adding heat-tracing to the water lines, then connect it to a switch upstairs. Turn it on when needed, off when not. Also, tank heaters are a wise option.

Bob&Patty
01-16-2012, 11:24 AM
John, I did what you suggested. Took a little time and about $50 in parts. I have never had a line freeze since the mod, but you have to run the heater. BTW, we have radiate floor heating now....didn't start out for that....but....but it just worked out that way. Send me a PM with your PH.# and I will explain how it did it.

JohnDar
01-16-2012, 08:36 PM
John, I did what you suggested. Took a little time and about $50 in parts. I have never had a line freeze since the mod, but you have to run the heater. BTW, we have radiate floor heating now....didn't start out for that....but....but it just worked out that way. Send me a PM with your PH.# and I will explain how it did it.

Thanks, Bob, but we don't use our rig in any sustained freezing weather. Granted, we've had some nights at the beginning or end of our season where it dipped into the low 30's at night, but no problems with the plumbing. My post was just a blue sky idea for those that do.

MC9
01-16-2012, 09:29 PM
Here in the Tucson, AZ area it often is below 25 at night last year we had 9-10 for three nights running. The outside hoses would freeze but not a single RV in this park of 300 sites froze. We let a faucet drip and that solves the problem. It is not as big a problem as some people think.

Wharton
01-17-2012, 07:36 AM
We have put light bulbs(incandescent) under the kitchen sink, lavatory and behind the UDC, connected to a switch and turn it on when it is getting cold. Never had anything freeze since doing this.