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View Full Version : Blocks under stabilizer jacks?



Shortest Straw
05-10-2015, 10:57 AM
I always have, even in storage, put blocks under all of my stabilizers jacks. Do you? I saw this when I went to check on my rig yesterday. I am not sure blocks would have helped in this situation, but surely spreading the weight out over more of an area doesn't hurt IMO.

36775

36776

pegmikef
05-10-2015, 11:19 AM
I always use at least 12 x 12 blocks under all the jacks for two reasons. 1) To help prevent the situation in your pictures and 2) I think the shorter distance that jacks have to extend increase the stability of the trailer.

Bohemian
05-10-2015, 12:09 PM
http://www.rv-boondocking-the-good-life.com/rvlevelingblocks.html

avvidclif
05-10-2015, 12:27 PM
http://www.rv-boondocking-the-good-life.com/rvlevelingblocks.html

While a very viable setup for leveling the rv on the tires I just don't think it would work as well under the auto-level jacks. Methinks it would tend to curl.

4"x6"x12" or 6"x8"x12" wood blocks work fine. X2 on keeping the travel as short as possible.

Bohemian
05-10-2015, 12:43 PM
While a very viable setup for leveling the rv on the tires I just don't think it would work as well under the auto-level jacks. Methinks it would tend to curl.

4"x6"x12" or 6"x8"x12" wood blocks work fine. X2 on keeping the travel as short as possible.


Go look at some horse mats. YOu will change your mind about curling.

JohnDar
05-10-2015, 02:54 PM
I made up a bunch of these cribbing pads from PT lumber. They're not going to warp or rot anytime soon. They can be laid flat in the bed of the truck and won't go flying out on the road. They were real handy when I installed the Ground Control jacks. After raising the rig on the OEM front jacks, I placed a stack of these under the drop frame and then raised the jacks to do the removal and install, setting the rig on the pads.

Doublegranch
05-10-2015, 03:47 PM
I use these rubber stall mats in each of my 4 indoor horse stalls. They are heavy and have no intentions of ever curling! They wear like iron and almost indestructible by the hoof of a horse, which places a max stress on these things. I have cut them to fit the 12 x 12 paddocks and while not easy to cut, it is very doable. I think this is a super idea for RV level block. Remember however these stall mats are not light...so add the weight to your gross weights.

avvidclif
05-10-2015, 03:53 PM
Go look at some horse mats. YOu will change your mind about curling.

I know exactly what horse mats are and if used on soft ground they WILL curl as the weight of the trailer tries to push them into the ground thus losing the desired effect of spreading the load. Realize I am talking about using them under the front landing gear or other jacks. Not under the tires where they would probably do fine.

I use the pads to spread the load as well as decrease the jack extension.

Doublegranch
05-10-2015, 03:59 PM
In my opinion, nothing in life is cast in stone and experiments stimulate learning. If you cut them to fit the size of your landing gear footprint, no way they can curl. If one decides to give them a try, the test may be worth the money well spent. It's not like the $38 will break the bank. You could also try to attach them to something rugged if you need more bottom out support. I am going to try them on my RV as a test as well.

avvidclif
05-10-2015, 05:03 PM
In my opinion, nothing in life is cast in stone and experiments stimulate learning. If you cut them to fit the size of your landing gear footprint, no way they can curl. If one decides to give them a try, the test may be worth the money well spent. It's not like the $38 will break the bank. You could also try to attach them to something rugged if you need more bottom out support. I am going to try them on my RV as a test as well.

Very true but the other purpose of the pad is to spread the load. I'll stick with my blocks. Keep us posted.

Kbvols
05-10-2015, 05:08 PM
I made up a bunch of these cribbing pads from PT lumber. They're not going to warp or rot anytime soon. They can be laid flat in the bed of the truck and won't go flying out on the road. They were real handy when I installed the Ground Control jacks. After raising the rig on the OEM front jacks, I placed a stack of these under the drop frame and then raised the jacks to do the removal and install, setting the rig on the pads.

I made the same cribbing pads as John...in fact it was a prior post of his that inspired me to make mine. I did cut a thick piece of rubber from old semi mud flap and screwed to the top. These things are rock solid and won't fly out of truck bed.


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JohnDar
05-10-2015, 07:08 PM
Hmmm, rubber mud flap topping....

pegmikef
05-11-2015, 06:50 PM
I made the same cribbing pads as John...in fact it was a prior post of his that inspired me to make mine. I did cut a thick piece of rubber from old semi mud flap and screwed to the top. These things are rock solid and won't fly out of truck bed.


That's interesting because I just raised my jacks to get ready for a trip to Arizona yesterday, and lo and behold termites had attacked the bottoms of two of my painted 4 x 12 x 12 wooden pads, the ones that weren't on the pavement. My thought was the same as yours, to screw rubber or vinyl on them, but on the bottom to protect them.

rpotter
05-11-2015, 11:21 PM
Yeh, be careful with wood. PT may be good. I used square wooden logs for use under the tongue jack of a travel trailer we used to own. Used them for a couple years and never a problem. Then one year vacationing in Florida while loading the logs into the back of my pickup I got bit by a fire ant. Fortunately only one because when I flipped the log over a small fisher in the log was crawling with them. Now I only use high strength composite pads.


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'Lil Guy'
05-12-2015, 04:08 AM
Those horse stall pads are made from recycled tires. I just bought a 4 X 8 X 3/4" sheet and cut it into 10 X 12s for my landing gear. I then used rubber cement to glue 4 of them together to make a couple of 3" blocks which seem very solid. Going to give that a try. I also made up a couple of 2 plies for the rear stabilizers and a couple of extras if needed. Sheet cost me about $38.00 and I still have a lot left over. I piece under a pad, maybe an issue, but with 4 put together they seem like a rock. I could always cut a piece of Delrin to go under them if need be but I don't think I'll need it.

SeattleLion
05-12-2015, 11:14 AM
We have inexpensive plastic "pads"; you know the yellow ones. We put them on the ground and then put 2 4X6 12" blocks side by side on the pads, then lower the jacks. We have the 6pt leveling system. If the ground is uneven we stack more 4x6's. We use the smaller wood to make it easier to handle. The wood is pressure treated and not heavy at all. This has worked very well for us. The plastic keeps the wood dry and clean.