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bld911b
02-10-2006, 01:13 PM
Greetings:

I'm looking seriously at Big Horn to purchase in April. Are the the dual pane windows house type sealed in a vacuum or just two panes of glass calked together?

Also does Big Horn give factory tours to prospective buyers?

Thanks,

Bill

bld911b
02-21-2006, 12:05 PM
I posted these questions over a week ago. I guess the factory doesn't want to help me with the answers. There definitely is a difference between a dual pane and a thermopane. I also would like to visit the factory before I buy. I hope this is not indicating the way I'd be treated after I buy! Thanks

Scott
02-21-2006, 01:18 PM
Well, I was trying to obtain the answer for you - then the weekend hit and I went out of town to a show and just haven't been able to get back on that one yet.
If you check my posts - you will see that I have a pretty good repsonse time to questions.
Your question was just one I've never heard before. I am pretty sure they are just two thicker panes of glass. If I find out different, I will let you know.

ST

arisce
02-21-2006, 03:29 PM
I think you are doing a great job Scott. So many negatives I thought it was time to accentuate the positive. Keep up the good work. It is appreciated by a lot of owners. Thanks! See you at the rally.

P.S. I know that the customer is always right but we are one big family and Scott (Heartland) is a member.

timk
02-21-2006, 08:42 PM
Greetings:

I'm looking seriously at Big Horn to purchase in April. Are the the dual pane windows house type sealed in a vacuum or just two panes of glass calked together?

Also does Big Horn give factory tours to prospective buyers?

Thanks,

Bill

Bill,
I believe thermopane is a brand name that circulated several years ago, and has now a became a generic reference to dual glass. Most of the inexpensive dual glass windows, simply have air in them. Its also my understanding that you dont gain much insulation value unless you add argon, or low-e films to the area between the glass.
TimK

Trap
02-21-2006, 08:56 PM
While your standard Thermopane window only has a R2 value it helps immensly wtih condensation on windows. To go with argon gas and lowe films it jumps to R3.3 and R4.2 (Low e film on both panes)

BillB800si
02-22-2006, 04:25 AM
While your standard Thermopane window only has a R2 value it helps immensly wtih condensation on windows. To go with argon gas and lowe films it jumps to R3.3 and R4.2 (Low e film on both panes)
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In regard to "condensation on windows" wouldn't it be of great benefit to have roof vents, to exhaust the excess moisture?

Just a thought.

Bill B.

Scott
02-22-2006, 07:41 AM
FYI - I talked to the engineer and while the dual pane windows we use in the RV industry do not have "gas" in them, they are created in a vacuum-type setting so that they are dust free and that layer of air trapped between the glass panes serves very much like the area between the two sets of glass doors that you find in most restaurants and shopping centers. It really cuts down on the amount of cold and heat transfer to the actual interior of the coach.

ST

Scott
02-22-2006, 07:49 AM
By the way - you are right - ROOF VENTS are a great idea. That's why we have been putting them on the Landmarks and Bighorns from day 1. They DO let out the moisture build up that you get from showering, cooking, sweating, etc.

ST

Trap
03-17-2006, 11:59 PM
The Roof vents help remove moisture from trailers, however with single pane windows you get condensation with even low amounts of humidity. When its cool to cold outside, the single pane of glass is almost same temp. as outside inside the unit causing condensation. With dual pane the inside layer of glass is much warmer than outside so you get way less condensation.

jpmorgan37
03-18-2006, 09:32 PM
I know that this is a Bighorn site, but I want to comment on the positive side of the dual pane windows (as I have done in other threads in this forum). We have them in our Grand Canyon and they are definately a positive addition for several reasons. When the temperature outside is cold (below freezing) or hot (high 80"s) the windows definately act as an insulator in that you don't feel the cold or the heat reflecting through them like you do with single pane windows. We have had no condensation with the dual pane glass. And, BTW Scott, I definately appreciate you candid answers and promptness, considering your schedule.

John