Cheapheat installed!

jbeletti

Director of Owners Interests, Heartland RVs
Staff member
You are correct, we are fulltiming and pay electric. For us the additional monthly cost was similar to running one AC unit in the summer. The biggest benefit was never having to worry you’d run low or ultimately out of propane — no more hauling heavy bottles!

For me, this is the best part of all - no propane tank schlepping. Those 40 pounders are super-heavy. 30's are a bit lighter but still - no fun.

My current tiny-trailer has two 20's. Easy! That said, my Cheap Heat is an AC-power only unit. And we use an induction cooktop for cooking. So our tanks last one to two seasons, using it only for the water heater when we want quick recovery or if we're boondocking or if we're on 30A shore power and need that power for Cheap Heat or air conditioning.
 

jayc

South Central Region Director, HOC
This will be our third winter with the Cheap Heat in use. Most of the places we stay are monthly and we pay our own electricity use. I love the fact that I don't have to haul (schlep) the heavy tanks around or go out in the middle of the night to switch over. The fact is, we have switched over to all-electric living. Electric heat, electric hot water and my wife cooks on her Insta-Pot, her induction cooktop or the convection oven and residential fridge. We have had this Landmark for almost three years and still on the original propane. Will it go stale?

It's nice to have the option of using propane when or if it is necessary.
 

Flick

Well-known member
This will be our third winter with the Cheap Heat in use. Most of the places we stay are monthly and we pay our own electricity use. I love the fact that I don't have to haul (schlep) the heavy tanks around or go out in the middle of the night to switch over. The fact is, we have switched over to all-electric living. Electric heat, electric hot water and my wife cooks on her Insta-Pot, her induction cooktop or the convection oven and residential fridge. We have had this Landmark for almost three years and still on the original propane. Will it go stale?

It's nice to have the option of using propane when or if it is necessary.

You’re in luck. Propane will never go stale because of no contact with air. The tank will eventually go out of date but not the propane. To everyone who has gone totally electric, kudos to you. That is simply smart.
 

TravelTiger

Founding Texas-West Chapter Leaders
You’re in luck. Propane will never go stale because of no contact with air. The tank will eventually go out of date but not the propane. To everyone who has gone totally electric, kudos to you. That is simply smart.

I guess we kinda have gone all electric too. Induction cooktop and convection micro. Always run water heater and fridge on electric, tho it switches to propane when we travel. So very minimal usage there.

Cheap heat even worked great in Angel Fire last winter when temps were below zero, until we had a power outage at 4am for about 10 min. When it came back on, of course the water heater wanted to heat, the converter wanted to convert, the fridge wanted to cool, tank heat pads were heating, plus the CheapHeat furnace all was a little much and we tripped the pedestal breaker. So we ended up just packing up earlier than we planned (alarm was set for 6am) to head home.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Nabo

Southeast Region Director, HOC
We also have gone 99.9% electric. Same as above, Nuwave induction cooking, convection oven cooking, CheapHeat and/or fireplace heating, residential refrig and electric hot H20 heating except when we are on 30 amps. Starting 3rd season and still haven't filled either one of the propane tanks yet.
 

ParkIt

Well-known member
We also have gone 99.9% electric. Same as above, Nuwave induction cooking, convection oven cooking, CheapHeat and/or fireplace heating, residential refrig and electric hot H20 heating except when we are on 30 amps. Starting 3rd season and still haven't filled either one of the propane tanks yet.
Good to know, that's exactly the direction I'm going though I wondered about the fireplace heater. I use a floor standing oil radiator in winter, works on 30 amp as well but sometimes the fireplace heater won't.
The only thing I'm not replacing is the fridge since the weight difference is pretty stout and I don't want that slide out to fail from it.
 

porthole

Retired
But sometimes, I can only get a 30A site. Cheap Heat still produces 1800 watts of heat (I think that's the number) on 30A power.

30 amp power with the add on relay kit.

1800 watts on 120v 30 amp
3750 or 5000 (selected during installation) on 240v 50 amp

The 30 amp kit on bigger RV's is limited in value, but it still does work. You just have to realize you are essentially using a 'small portable electric heater' connected to all your duct work.
And, you will be drawing about 15 amps just for the heater, so keep that in mind with other electric use in the RV.
 
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