Tow vehicle options

KDube

Member
Hi all,
Taking delivery of a Landmark Daytona 365 later this month and wondering about tow options. Dry weight is about 15,000lbs, is it necessary to go with a dually? Have only looked at fords so far and it looks like it's possible to get away without going that route, but not sure.
TIA,
Kevin
 

danemayer

Moderator
Staff member
Ignore the dry weight and base your decision on GVWR. Most people, when they load up their RVs, are close to GVWR. The pin weight, when loaded, will be 20-25% of GVWR and will likely exceed the payload spec for most single rear wheel trucks. Remember when considering payload, you have to add pin weight, as well as passengers, pets, tools, firewood, hitch weight, bed liner, bed cover, and anything else in the truck.
 

09Busaman

Active Member
Your pin weight on that unit exceeds 3k pounds and the gross weight is 18k. Look at potential trucks you are interested in and combine the gross weight of the coach, plus the gross weight of the truck, and if the number is less than the gross combined weight of the truck rating you should be fine. We have a dually, our unit is 16k gross, I would not attempt to pull our coach with a single rear wheel truck. As stated above, the payload capacity of the truck is everything in the truck including the pin weight of the coach. With a payload capacity of over 5300lbs on the truck and a pin weight of 2725lbs on my coach, I have a nice margin for loading our truck. I looked at the latest 2022 Ford specs, and I believe a 6.7 diesel long bed, 4x4 SRW pin weight is 2800lbs, that is already exceeding the pin weight of your coach before you put anything else in the truck. Here is the link to Fords website so can compare numbers: https://www.ford.com/trucks/super-duty/models/f350-xlt/
 

hoefler

Well-known member
When loaded and ready to go, you pin weight will more likely 4000-4500, plus hitch, passengers, gear, and anything else you want to haul. You are well with in dually territory
 

Confused

Member
Better to have more and not need it. I'll put another vote down for DRW. I'm also a fan of long beds vs short beds. I backed into a site this last weekend and had the truck/trailer at nearly a 90 degree angle to squeeze in. Never an issue with a long bed but can be with a short bed even with a slider.
 

southernlady5464

Well-known member
We have a 2015 F450 Long bed. We tow a Landmark Charleston. Total weight is 18,000 lbs but our truck can easily tow much more. We jokingly say we could tow a medium third world country.

Whatever you get, do not trust the sales weasels at the dealership to tell you. Look it up for yourself.

For Ford: https://www.fleet.ford.com/towing-guides/
 

MTPockets

Well-known member
Most of the manufacturer payload charts show the maximum payload for a stripped down truck.., don't use it for making your choice. My opinion is that your only choice is which DRW truck to buy....
 

thewanderingeight

Active Member
I would go for a DRW. Our Milestone has a GVWR of 15k and after weighing everything, our hitch weight ended up being about 3.5k just for the RV alone and doesn't count the tools and everything else I have in the truck. If I remember correctly, it would have been difficult to find an SRW to handle that much weight. Also, keep in mind the more options you have on the truck, the less payload you get as the extra weight from the components, such as four-wheel drive, adds on additional weight to the vehicle.
 

CDN

B and B
Look at the CCC of the truck you want to buy. I looked at a SRW Lariat 2020 F350 Crew 8 ft box. The CCC was 4600 lbs. That is enough to tow your 18,000 lb coach. A decision you make on what you need is yours. FTR I tow with a SRW 2016 F350 Lariat Crew Shortbox with snowplow prep and Camper Package. My CCC is 3800 lbs. I tow a 38 ft Landmark 18,000 lb GVWR loaded weight just under 16,000 lbs My pin is 2,900 and we are under maximum CCC all loaded in the truck. I use my truck all winter daily driver with snow rated tires. No way do I want a dually sliding around.

Good luck finding what is right for you.
 
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