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View Full Version : Placing NC on Blocks and Tie Down



LookN4Ward
11-23-2009, 10:01 AM
I will use the 29RKS LS North Country as a snowbird residence. The RV Park we are in requires that travel trailers be tied down and skirted. Before I get it tied down I would like to place the trailer on concrete blocks. The lot has an asphalt pad below where the trailer is positioned.

I've looked under the trailer and can't see much because the underbelly is covered. I've searched for ideas for placing a trailer on blocks, but didn't find much. I have the trailer leveled very nicely using the scissor jacks on each corner so I have an idea of the distances between the frame and the ground. I've bought some concrete blocks to build some piers, but I am unsure where to place the piers. I don't want to twist the frame.

It appears I should build 4 piers, the piers place on each side the two axles. In turn I would place a concrete block under each scissor jack and use them to keep the front and rear level. After getting the trailer blocked I could then release the air in the tires to get the weight off of them and on to the blocks.

I'm also considering placing 4"X4"X8' posts on top of the block piers to stabilize the center of the trailer and eliminate some rocking. Keep in mind I must tie the trailer down at the front and rear. Is it a safe assumption that piers can be placed under the frame on each side of the axles?

2010augusta
11-24-2009, 08:03 PM
What does the trailer get tied down to? What kind of ground anchors are you using?

Bob&Patty
11-24-2009, 10:25 PM
Are you in earthquake or tornado country. I cant imagine a 31' NC just falling over by it's self. :confused: Bob:D:D

SmokeyBare
11-24-2009, 11:42 PM
I helped a Fella drive/drill several "Tie Down Rods" into the ground to satisfy the requirements that area of Florida had for RV's left year round on a site. That park also required the RV be skirted some how... most there was using the plastic lattice panels bought at the local building centers. They cut them to the height needed... and attached them to PVC pipe they stuck in the ground behind the lattice panels. He used deck screws to secure the lattice panel to the PVC Pipe. In Florida... the intend was to keep critters from living under the RV's... not to keep COLD out.

The Anchors he had were 48 inches long... with a U shaped steel bracket on top. They used a split bolt to crank down a flat metal strap attached to the frame of the RV. We used that steel bracket on top... with a 2x4 stuck between it... to screw into the ground the 4 foot long Anchor. Slow going with out the correct power tools.

Here is a few links to better explain the whats and the Whys....

http://www.mygreathome.com/fix-it_guide/tiedowns.htm

http://www.tiedown.com/deanchors.html

Good Luck With the Project.

Marv

LookN4Ward
11-25-2009, 07:03 AM
Thanks Smokey for the info, especially the idea for the skirting. My trailer is in McAllen Tx and can get some high winds and is about 70 miles inland from the Gulf. I'm paying a local firm to do the tie down. Before I do the tie down I wanted to put the weight of trailer on blocks and I am seeking info on the where I should put the block piers. Others in the park have done this and then removed the tires and wheels.

Tom of Ypsi
11-25-2009, 08:25 AM
Are you leaving your trailer in McAllen permanently? If you are I can understand the parks demands but if not I would look for another park. We have been down there for the past two winters and have never experienced winds strong enough to blow our trailer over. You can partially drop the underside and see where the frame is or just crawl under with a small hammer and bang around a little. Put your blocks where you found the framing plus some blocks somewhere around the outside center of the trailer for added stability. Dropping the underside is not that big of a deal especially if you are only taking a peak.

SmokeyBare
11-25-2009, 09:34 AM
As Tom has already stated... The Frame is where to locate any supports. The Frame supports the walls, roof, and everything inside.

I would consider placing 3 to 4 piers on each side of the RV... following the length of the frame... perhaps a pier in front and behind the tires... and one at behind the front landing gear and one in front of the rear stabilizer. This could be considered Over Kill... but if your using blocks the cost is pretty low.

I would use solid blocks if I could find them as they hold up far better than hollow core blocks. Be aware that you can purchase different thicknesses of solid blocks as well. There is always a chance of ground movement... solid blocks would not fracture as quickly as a hollow core block would.

I would also place a slab of wood between the blocks and the frame of the RV. You are going to see the Corrugated Plastic (Coroplast) become scored from the weight of the RV... I don't see how you can prevent that... in my view it won't hurt it at all... and the wood against the corrugated plastic will reduce the damage.

Got to say it breaks my heart to see a RV tied down... preventing it from roaming this beautiful country of ours... :)

Marv

LookN4Ward
11-25-2009, 12:37 PM
Are you leaving your trailer in McAllen permanently? If you are I can understand the parks demands but if not I would look for another park. We have been down there for the past two winters and have never experienced winds strong enough to blow our trailer over. You can partially drop the underside and see where the frame is or just crawl under with a small hammer and bang around a little. Put your blocks where you found the framing plus some blocks somewhere around the outside center of the trailer for added stability. Dropping the underside is not that big of a deal especially if you are only taking a peak.

We are leaving the trailer there permanently. We own our own lot.