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View Full Version : 1/2 ton truck and North Country 30 BHS



scotteam
07-01-2012, 07:17 PM
i have a 1500 silverado 9400 tow capacity. i have a 30 bhs that i just purchased with a husky hitch distribution and sway control. Anyone drag this rig with this set up. I have not picked mine up yet.

rig says 10153 total max weight
dry weight is 7200 pounds

any hints

jnbhobe
07-01-2012, 07:41 PM
Get a bigger truck!!!! You will be way over weight and under powered.

(any hints)

Sandie
07-01-2012, 08:21 PM
Hubby says you need a 3/4 ton. Your pushing it there.

Ray LeTourneau
07-01-2012, 08:33 PM
I agree with the others, you'll need more truck to be safe and comfortable while towing. Not only will you exceed the towing capacity even if moderately loaded, you'll be over the trucks GVWR for sure with the tongue weight and passengers etc.

DW_Gray
07-03-2012, 04:59 PM
Yep, overweight. Check out the info in my signature below.

Bob&Patty
07-04-2012, 10:33 AM
Yes you will be overweight. I would suggest a 3/4t truck and if you are concerned with fuel mileage. Get a diesel engine. The truck will be more money going in....but the better fuel mileage will repay you over the long run.

gsglawson
07-04-2012, 11:18 AM
Newbie here so still learning. If his truck can tow 9400lbs and his dry weight is 7200lbs wouldn't that leave him 2000lbs or so for food, water, gear, etc?

jimtoo
07-04-2012, 12:25 PM
Newbie here so still learning. If his truck can tow 9400lbs and his dry weight is 7200lbs wouldn't that leave him 2000lbs or so for food, water, gear, etc?

Hi gsglawson,

Welcome to the Heartland Owners Forum and family. We have a great bunch of people here with lots of information and all willing to share their knowledge if needed.

Enjoy the forum.

Jim M

Ray LeTourneau
07-04-2012, 12:44 PM
Newbie here so still learning. If his truck can tow 9400lbs and his dry weight is 7200lbs wouldn't that leave him 2000lbs or so for food, water, gear, etc?

Welcome to the Heartland Forum. The advertised weights are seldom the same as the actual rig coming off the line. There are more numbers than trailer weight to be considered. GVWR of the truck, GCWR of the truck and trailer and then you also have to consider passengers, fuel, cargo and the tongue weight of the trailer.
Heartland has an averaging system they use for advertised weights. The way i understand it, they take an average of lets say, 5 trailers of the same model coming off the line. This is what they use as their advertised weight. Options may vary and usually, the rig is a bit heavier than advertised.

Roadrash
07-04-2012, 03:56 PM
My 2012 30BHS, as delivered with power awning and jacks, dry weight was over 8300lbs. The brouchure weight was, as you stated, about 7200lbs. The power awning and elecrtic stab jacks don't weigh 1100lbs. You will be pushing over your tow capacity loaded for camping. You will also most likely cap out on tongue weight and not be able to carry anything in the bed of your truck. I have a 1200lb weight distribution hitch for mine and it is just perfect with 2 atvs on the back of my truck. I back off a link on the bars without the atvs as I estimated about 900 to 1000lbs tongue weight. My truck is a F350 superduty diesel and pulls it like nothing but you know its there handling wise. That siad I wouldn't get rid of the 30BHS, really like the trailer and very happy with the choosing it.

Roadrash
07-04-2012, 04:14 PM
Newbie here so still learning. If his truck can tow 9400lbs and his dry weight is 7200lbs wouldn't that leave him 2000lbs or so for food, water, gear, etc?

Yes and No. Paper wise, yes. Real world, No. You really need to have the trailer wieghed to get the actual dry weight. Everything, including the hitch, counts towards trailer weight and that gets eaten up fast as some manufactures do not include propane and battery. For example: 2 30lb propane tanks= 150lbs, full water= 400lbs, good battery= 70lbs, spare tire and mount= 100lbs. As you can see, almost half of the trucks "extra" capacity has been used up. If the dry weight was wrong on the low side, it eats even more! You have to do your math to see if your cabable of towing the trailer within the trucks rated capacities. or to make it really easy, look for trailers that thier max capacity doesn't exceed your trucks tow capacity

Silverado23
07-05-2012, 11:33 AM
Take it all across the scale. both dry and after you have loaded with your gear and passengers. This will help you figure out where you need to be weightwise.
Just don't plan on traveling to mountainous areas and prepare to take your time getting to your destination. Tires are probably only rated for 65 MPH anyways.

JULJEN17
02-22-2013, 08:50 AM
I had a 08 Chevy Avalanche and a 30USBH. To big for that. Bought a GMC Yukon 2500. Works great but gets 8mpg. Just bought a 38QBBH. GMC still pulls it though I have a seasonal site now.