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orion7144
03-18-2018, 05:42 PM
Not sure if this is the right sub forum but I am a bit concerned about backing into my driveway. We finally pick up our Traveler 32RS on the 26th and for the first couple of days it will be at our house before heading to the storage lot since we can not keep it at our house (stupid HOA's). Being our first trailer I have had a lot of questions. Attached are a couple of shots of our driveway. it is ~45' long so that is not and issue. If I am able to back it in do I just stack some blocks under the front legs to get it somewhat level?5696956970

danemayer
03-18-2018, 06:02 PM
Hi orion7144,

You'll have a lot of blocks and you'll also need to chock the wheels effectively - gravity won't be your friend. Also, when backing in, watch for the ladder and anything else under the trailer at the back. And, keep an eye on the clearance between the pinbox and truck bed rails as the pinbox swings around.

jerryjay11
03-18-2018, 06:02 PM
Your driveway doesn't look too bad. I bet you jacks will reach the drive. If not you can easily use wood or concrete blocks so you won't have to run the jacks down as much. As long as the jack pads fit on whatever you use for blocks. Wouldn't hurt to pick up some leveling blocks from Walmart. You'll probably need them anyway.

orion7144
03-18-2018, 06:23 PM
I already ordered the leveling blocks from amazon. When I hooked up the trailer yesterday before we signed the papers I was a bit surprised at how little the rear squatted and I was also pleasantly surprised that I had ~7" clearance on the bed rails. It was parked between other trailers so I could not tell how level it was but It looked pretty good.
I am thinking I will not be able to swing out to back up so I will have to hug the curb so the wheels will hit before the bumper does. Of course this is all beginner thinking.

ram22
03-18-2018, 06:55 PM
Not sure if this is the right sub forum but I am a bit concerned about backing into my driveway. We finally pick up our Traveler 32RS on the 26th and for the first couple of days it will be at our house before heading to the storage lot since we can not keep it at our house (stupid HOA's). Being our first trailer I have had a lot of questions. Attached are a couple of shots of our driveway. it is ~45' long so that is not and issue. If I am able to back it in do I just stack some blocks under the front legs to get it somewhat level?5696956970

Why do you need to level it all? It's in your driveway for a day or two. If you must, at least don't bother driving the tires up on plastic leveling blocks. Lateral looks level enough on your driveway. Level the tongue after chalking the trailer tires, but I have heard of trailers rolling over chalks or sliding them downhill. I recommend rubber chalks. I bought a pair at Walmart. Don't use plastic chalks.


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CoveredWagon
03-19-2018, 08:06 AM
Why do you need to level it all? It's in your driveway for a day or two. If you must, at least don't bother driving the tires up on plastic leveling blocks. Lateral looks level enough on your driveway. Level the tongue after chalking the trailer tires, but I have heard of trailers rolling over chalks or sliding them downhill. I recommend rubber chalks. I bought a pair at Walmart. Don't use plastic chalks.

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Harbor Freight has excellent rubber chalks

mlpeloquin
03-19-2018, 12:22 PM
Why do you need to level it all? It's in your driveway for a day or two. If you must, at least don't bother driving the tires up on plastic leveling blocks. Lateral looks level enough on your driveway. Level the tongue after chalking the trailer tires, but I have heard of trailers rolling over chalks or sliding them downhill. I recommend rubber chalks. I bought a pair at Walmart. Don't use plastic chalks.


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He maybe thinking about doing so in the future in order to cool down the fridge before going out.

orion7144
03-19-2018, 06:35 PM
He maybe thinking about doing so in the future in order to cool down the fridge before going out.

Yes have to keep the beer cool.

NYSUPstater
03-20-2018, 03:41 AM
Get a couple PT 2x4x8 and place in gutter to lesson the gap/transition between street and d-way. We have same set up, but discovered we don't need the 2x's afterall. Take your time and have a spotter or 2 outside watching all angles and possible points of contact on truck, d-way and trailer on both. The leveling jacks or legs (if so equipped w/ 6 pt level up) could hit 1st while backing up. Once in d-way, not sure how much of an angle you have, but it may NOT be possible to level 100% for back end "may" hit. If not, cut up a 6x6x8 into 18"-24" lengths to place under front legs to shorten the gap between pad/leg and ground. Also, may have to tinker here, but add a wedge or so, so pads are level when the hit the blocks of wood. As for remaining pads/legs, we cut up 2x10 (or 12) into 16" lengths and screwed 2 together and attached a handle to 1 and place them under each leg for support on grass as well to cut the gap down. As for chocking your wheels in d-way, well you could at 1st, but if you level it, may be a chance you'll lift tires off the ground so chocking them won't do you any good----again depending on pitch of d-way.

jbeletti
03-20-2018, 07:19 AM
Here's the chock I use (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002T08K8S/). It worked well on my Tennessee driveway where I had a 7 degree pitch.

57000

In terms of your ladder, that could be an issue. To prepare for your first back in, have a good spotter and go very slow. If it looks like the ladder will scrape the driveway, pull back out and get your cordless screw gun with a phillips head in it.

Remove the lower loop rung by taking the plastic end caps off the lower rung, then the long screws off the horizontal supports and pull that bottom loop off. Later, to shorten it, you'll only need a tubing cutter. I'd take off 1.5 to 2 inches. I've done this a couple of times.